Jay Nixon

(UPI/Tom Uhlenbrock)

Two bills have been filed in the Missouri House regarding the use of the state’s so-called Rainy Day fund.

The first would authorize $150 million to be used to match FEMA expenditures on tornado and flood damage across the state.  The second bill would set up a joint House-Senate committee to oversee the use of Rainy Day funds for natural disasters.

They’re sponsored by House Budget Chairman Ryan Silvey (R, Kansas City).  He wants Governor Jay Nixon (D) to expand the call of the special session to include both bills.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

The Missouri State Senator who sponsored the measure strictly limiting teacher-student contact via Facebook and other social media has filed legislation she says will clear up any confusion over the new law.

The issue was added Tuesday to the call of the special session by Governor Jay Nixon (D), but in his call the governor only stipulated that the language in question be removed, not replaced with new language.

(Harrison Sweazea/Mo. Senate)

A State Senator from Cape Girardeau today delayed the start of the special session by three hours, then continued to slow the process down after bills were allowed to be introduced.

Republican Jason Crowell is objecting to what he calls a “micromanaged" list of priorities by Democratic Governor Jay Nixon.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Missouri lawmakers are set to return to the State Capitol next week for a special legislative session.

Both Democratic Governor Jay Nixon and Republican legislative leaders estimate it’ll take no more than two weeks to debate and pass bills dealing with a dozen issues, including air cargo tax credits, social media communications between teachers and students, and local control of the St. Louis Police Department.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Governor Jay Nixon (D) is traveling around the state this week, urging Missouri lawmakers to pass numerous tax credit proposals during the upcoming special session.

Before leaving today for Kansas City, Marceline and St. Louis, he met with reporters in his State Capitol office.  He told them passing the incentives are crucial for job creation, but that the overall number of tax breaks also needs to be reined in.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Gov. Jay Nixon is continuing to defend a decision to withhold more than $170 million from the fiscal year 2012 budget, despite a constitutional challenge from another statewide official.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Most of the new laws passed by the Missouri General Assembly this year officially took effect over the weekend, on August 28.

They include the controversial ban on late-term abortions that Governor Jay Nixon (D) allowed to become law without his signature.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Missouri auditor Tom Schweich has sued Gov. Jay Nixon over $170 million in funds the governor withheld from the 2012 budget to pay for disaster relief.

An audit released by Schweich's office last week was sharply critical of the withholds. The suit filed today is based on many of the audit's findings, including:

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Governor Jay Nixon (D) wants to move Missouri’s universities and community colleges back to a performance-based funding model.

It would mark a return to the way business was once conducted.  Graduation rates and similar markers were used as a basis for funding public colleges in Missouri, but the system was dumped a decade ago during an economic recession.

(via Flickr/neil conway)

Here's an update to a story we shared with you this morning:

Top officials from Missouri's legislative, executive and judicial branches are joining forces in an effort to revamp Missouri's criminal sentencing practices.

Missouri officials are working with the Pew Center on the States to analyze current sentencing laws, prison and probation programs and recidivism rates. Other states that have done similar studies have enacted laws directing more nonviolent offenders to enhanced probation and drug treatment programs. That generally saves prison beds for the most serious and violent offenses.

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