jazz

Courtesy St. Louis Ragtimers

Ragtime pianist and scholar Trebor Tichenor passed away last month after a stroke. He was 74. Longtime St. Louis Public Radio listeners may remember his weekly program “Ragophile” that aired on the station in the 1970s and ‘80s.

We dedicated the entire hour of Cityscape today to remembering Tichenor with his son Andy Tichenor and fellow band members Don Franz and Al Stricker.

Richard McDonnell
MAXJAZZ

Word spread quickly on social media this past weekend: Richard McDonnell, founder and president of the St. Louis-based MAXJAZZ recording label, had died.

One of the first tributes posted -- by Dean Minderman, editor of the respected music blog “St. Louis Jazz Notes” -- was put up to replace rumor with facts. Yes, McDonnell had suffered a stoke while attending a concert Feb. 7 at Jazz at the Bistro. He died the next day.

photo of George Sams
Provided by Mr. Sams

This past February, George Sams, owner of the Metropolitan Gallery, decided to close the space at 2943 Locust St. Sams had mounted art exhibitions there since taking it over in 2005 and also presented regular concerts as part of his Nu-Art Performance Series.

Musicians included Hamiet Bluiett and Oliver Lake -- natives of the St. Louis area who went on to international acclaim as members of the World Saxophone Quartet – as well as famed pianist Andrew Hill and trumpeter Eddie Henderson.

Musician Brian Owens
Brian Owens | Jarred Gastreich

St. Louis vocalist Brian Owens will be performing a holiday concert to benefit a University of Missouri-St. Louis scholarship fund this Sunday at the Bistro at Grand Center. The event is sponsored by the UMSL African American Alumni Chapter.

"It’s been a real blessing for me to continue in partnership with the university I graduated from," said Owens, who graduated in 2008.

In addition to his connections with UMSL, Owens also has working relationships with Sterling Bank and other local businesses.

Ben Hejkal / (Courtesy Lindy Hop St. Louis)

Arch City Radio Hour is a program hosted by Nick Garcia on St. Louis Public Radio's HD-2 Channel, The Gateway. The show features conversations and performances with St. Louis area musicians.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The big band era may have peaked in the decades of the 1930s and ‘40s, but don’t tell that to the musicians who make up the Route 66 Jazz Orchestra. They are committed to keeping big band music alive and vital in the St. Louis area.

That commitment was put to the test just last year. From 1969 until right before the fall semester started in 2012, the group was the Meramec Lab Jazz Band. Suddenly, funding was cut and the musicians regrouped.

Tom McDermott
Provided by Mr. McDermott

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: If you’re a fan of the HBO television series, “Treme,” you know that over its first three seasons, the show’s episodes have been filled with an array of musical artists from the New Orleans music scene, including Doctor John, Allen Toussaint, Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews, Irma Thomas and Kermit Ruffins to groups like the Rebirth Brass Band, Galactic and the Treme Brass Band.

Anna Webber

Kurt Elling is a prominent American jazz vocalist.  Each of his ten albums have been nominated for a Grammy award and he has been named “Male Singer of the Year” by the Jazz Journalists Association eight times.

Theresa Cassagne

St. Louis native Jeremy Davenport is a jazz trumpeter and vocalist now based in New Orleans.

Davenport, 42, grew up in a family of musicians.  His mother was a music educator for nearly 50 years and his father recently retired from the St. Louis Symphony.

Davenport’s performances harken back to a time when Jazz was at its peak popularity though his unique style and mood of storytelling creates a modern edge.

The Left Coast over the years has been the host to many great jazz clubs.  The October 21 show presents jazz recorded in clubs in San Francisco, Oakland, Santa Cruz and Seattle.  Some of the clubs are The Jazz Workshop, Yoshi's, Keystone Corner and the Blackhawk in the San Francisco Bay area and Jazz Alley and The Penthouse in Seattle.  We feature such musicians as the Ray Brown Trio, the Yerba Buena Jazz Band, Shelly Manne, Cannonball Adderley, Thelonious Monk, Henry Threadgill, John Coltrane and Pharoah Sanders.

Jazz and Money

Oct 19, 2012

Money makes the world go 'round. This episode of Jazz Unlimited will feature Duke Ellington, Muggsy Sprecher, Benny Carter, Dizzy Gillespie, Count Basie and others with tunes about money.

Your financial support for St. Louis Public Radio helps keep Jazz Unlimited on the air.  We hope that you are contributing during the Fall Membership Campaign. Thanks to all who have contributed so far.

According to the Missouri State Archives, Juneteenth is officially recognized today in 41 states, including Missouri. NPR Music provides this selection of "five recordings, picked by five musicians, which represent the triumphs and tribulations within the freedom struggle."

Charlie Hunter hasn't used his famous 8-string bass-guitar hybrid for some three years now.   These days, it's seven strings.  He's got the low three of a bass and the middle four of a guitar, all tuned a minor third higher than normal.  He happily abandoned the highest string in favor of a more condensed and practical version of his one-of-a-kind instrument.  He may be practicing more drums than guitar nowadays anyway. His 2nd solo album, Public Domain, is highly percussive. Released on his own label, Public Domain kicks the dust off eleven old standards from his grandfather's era, who turns one hundred this year.

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