Jeanette Mott Oxford

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay speaks an announcement earlier this year of 24-hour shifts to build a riverfront stadium. Some doubt that Slay will "vigorously defend" an ordinance requiring a vote to publicly fund St. Louis sports stadiums.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

You don’t have to try that hard to get St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay to express effusive support for a new football stadium on his city’s riverfront.

With the St. Louis Rams potentially bolting to the Los Angeles area, Slay joined with Gov. Jay Nixon and numerous labor unions in backing the roughly $1 billion stadium. For the Democratic mayor, the project would not only provide steady work for thousands of people – it would revitalize a rather drab part of St. Louis’ riverfront.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

An estimated 200 people braved the heat and humidity to gather outside the Missouri Capitol and commemorate the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech, delivered during the March on Washington on August 28th, 1963.

Several speakers took turns reading portions of King's famous speech, including the Reverend James Howard Jr. of Jefferson City.

"I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed, 'we hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal,'" Howard said as he quoted King.

(via state of Missouri website)

In 1961, Theodore McNeal, an official with the union representing Pullman porters, went to Jefferson City as the Senator from the 7th District.

Since then, the city of St. Louis has always had at least one black state senator. But redistricting and term limits may put that 52-year-streak in jeopardy.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

The Missouri House has passed legislation that would bar local governments from interfering with the day-to-day operations of alternatives to abortion agencies.

The bill would forbid municipalities from regulating advertising and advice given out by crisis pregnancy centers run by pro-life groups.  Supporters say they’re trying to protect the First Amendment free speech rights of volunteers and staff at the centers.  The sponsor, State Rep. Chuck Gatschenberger (R, Lake St. Louis), admits it’s a preemptive move.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Around a hundred demonstrators rallied outside the State Capitol today to protest plans to induct conservative talk show host Rush Limbaugh into the Hall of Famous Missourians.

Limbaugh has come under fire for calling Georgetown University law student Sandra Fluke a “slut” and a “prostitute" on his nationally-syndicated radio program.  Fluke had testified in favor of President Obama’s birth control policies before Congressional Democrats.  Fellow Democrat and State House Member Jeanette Mott Oxford told the crowd in Jefferson City that it would be wrong for visitors to the State Capitol to see a bust of Limbaugh in the third floor Rotunda.

(via Flickr/Fried Dough)

Yet another bill has been filed in the General Assembly this year that would raise Missouri’s cigarette tax, currently the lowest in the nation.

This one would raise it to 75 percent of the current national average – in other words, from 17 cents per pack to $1.09-1/2 cents per pack.  Missouri’s tax per pack would also rise or fall as the national average changes, and it would require a referendum by Missouri voters to take effect.  The bill was filed by State Rep. Jeanette Mott Oxford (D, St. Louis), who spoke in favor of raising the cigarette tax during budget debates on Thursday.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

The Missouri House has given first-round approval to legislation that would require driver’s license exams be given only in English.

Currently, the state of Missouri provides the written driver’s exam in English and eleven other languages.  House Member Mark Parkinson (R, St. Charles) says his bill follows the spirit of the state constitution’s mandate that public proceedings be conducted in English.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

One day after giving it first-round approval, the Missouri House has passed a proposed constitutional amendment to place spending caps on the state budget.

During final debates, State Representative Jeanette Mott Oxford (D, St. Louis) argued that limiting spending to the yearly inflation rate and population growth could make it very hard for lawmakers to address critical needs in the future.

(via Flickr/dbking)

While Missouri legislative leaders have reached an agreement on an economic development package, some lawmakers are speaking out against it.

The key component is the so-called Aerotropolis measure, which would provide $360 million in tax credits to transform Lambert Airport in St. Louis into an international air cargo hub.

(via Flickr/dbking)

The Missouri House has passed the Aerotropolis bill, which is designed to turn Lambert Airport in St. Louis into a global air freight hub.

The bill would provide around $480 million in tax incentives, which companies could use to build cargo facilities near Lambert Airport.

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