Jennifer Joyce

St. Louis Circuit Attorney Jennifer Joyce
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

After months of mulling, St. Louis Circuit Attorney Jennifer Joyce has made her decision.  She’s not going to run for a fifth term next year.

Joyce said in an exclusive interview that the problem isn’t her job. She still loves it. “Anyone who knows me knows I love the circuit attorney’s office,” Joyce said.

But she also wants to enjoy her personal life. And after 16 years as the city’s longest-serving circuit attorney, Joyce said it will be time to do something else.

Elizabeth Beard Davis announces a $25,000 reward for anyone who has information about the death of her brother Rick, near the intersection where he was hit while riding his bike on June 20, 2014.
Sarah Kellogg/St. Louis Public Radio intern

The family of a cyclist who was killed while biking on city streets nearly a year ago is now offering a $25,000 reward to find the person who struck him.

Rick Beard was an Army veteran and a safety-conscious cyclist who would stop to chastise other bikers who were not following the rules, said his younger sister, Elizabeth Beard Davis. He had just turned 54 on June 20, 2014 when he was hit by a car at the corner of Sarah St. and Cook Ave., just west of Grand Center.

Joseph Leahy / St. Louis Public Radio

About 25 protesters rallied outside the Carnahan Courthouse in downtown St. Louis Friday afternoon, demanding Circuit Attorney Jennifer Joyce convene a “town hall” meeting to push for reforms in police tactics and the municipal justice system.

Deputies from the St. Louis Sheriff’s Department outnumbered the group of peaceful demonstrators, lining up along the granite stairs of the courthouse’s main entrance on Market Street.  

Circuit attorney Jennifer Joyce on SLOTA June 3
Alex Heuer/St. Louis Public Radio

Circuit attorney Jennifer Joyce has been in the news quite a bit recently. Her decision not to charge a St. Louis Metropolitan Police officer in the shooting death of VonDerritt Myers sparked protests at her house, which led to multiple arrests, and internal investigations into the way police officers handled the incident.

St. Louis Circuit Attorney Jennifer Joyce
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

The Politically Speaking podcast team welcomed St. Louis Circuit Attorney Jennifer Joyce as its latest guest for what turned out to be a particularly spirited show.

Joyce is a St. Louis native with deep political roots. Both of her parents – Jack and Nellene Joyce – served as aldermen in the 23rd Ward (the old home turf of Mayor Francis Slay.)

Joyce graduated from  Bishop DuBourg High School in south St. Louis and obtained her law degree from Saint Louis University School of Law in 1987.

St. Louis Circuit Attorney Jennifer Joyce has called Amendment 5 "a disaster." She's been heaping criticism on the "gun rights" measure for months.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

When Amendment 5 was put before voters last August, 602,863 Missourians cast their ballots in favor of a measure aimed at bolstering the Show Me State’s gun rights.

It’s safe to say St. Louis Circuit Attorney Jennifer Joyce was not among those voters.

St. Louis Circuit Attorney Jennifer Joyce speaks with reporters about how her office will seek warrants for drivers who refuse breath tests.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI | File photo

St. Louis American - KANSAS CITY – “Last year in the city of St. Louis we had 159 homicides, 138 through gun violence, and more than 90 percent of the victims were young, African-American males,” St. Louis Circuit Attorney Jennifer M. Joyce, the city’s elected prosecutor, said Monday at Kansas City Police Department headquarters. “We cannot have that again.”

Washington University

The prosecuting attorney for St. Louis says a new anti-drunk-driving policy implemented in St. Louis in 2013 has made the roads in the city and across the region safer.

The city implemented a so-called "no-refusal zone" policy at the end of 2013. It means police are asking judges for warrants to draw the blood of any suspected drunk driver who refuses a Breathalyzer test. Before, police would ask to have blood drawn only if the driver had been in an accident.   

City of St. Louis

St. Louis Recorder of Deeds Sharon Carpenter, the city’s longest-serving current citywide official, is stepping down from office amid a probe into whether she violated the state’s nepotism law.

But Carpenter is expected to seek election to a new term in a few weeks – and she still has the endorsement of Mayor Francis Slay.

The nepotism ban only applies to her current term, which ends in December. It does not bar her from seeking the office again.

St. Louis Police Chief Sam Dotson (L) and St. Louis Circut Attorney Jennifer Joyce look on as St. Louis Fire Chief Dennis Jenkerson talks to reporters about the city's "no refusal" policy with drunk drivers. Prosecutors will now seek warrants to draw bloo
Bill Greenblatt/UPI

The end of state control of the St. Louis Police Department was literally centuries in the making. But St. Louis Police Chief Sam Dotson said the change hasn’t been obvious to city residents. 

  

And that, he said, is a good thing.

“Local control has been a significant step for the metropolitan police department,” Dotson said. “And really, you haven’t noticed anything. It’s been seamless and transparent like it was supposed to be.”

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