John Diehl

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Beacon.

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon’s Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about the week’s politics.

On this week's show: Mo. House Majority Leader John Diehl joins us to discuss the vote count on the controversial income tax cut bill, as well as what veto session is shaping up to look like on a variety of other bills (Doe Run, the so-called gun nullification bill, and Agenda 21). We also discuss Diehl's race against fellow Republican Rep. Caleb Jones for the Speaker's gavel.

Missouri House Communications

A Missouri lawmaker who threatened to resign unless one or both of his key bills survived the last day of the 2013 legislative session is staying put, even though both bills failed to make it out by Friday's deadline.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Missouri lawmakers have sent a nearly $25 billion budget to Governor Jay Nixon (D).

Missouri House leaders have announced "a compromise proposal" on the tax credit bill that's become stalled during the ongoing special legislative session.

In a press release issued today, State Representatives John Diehl (R, Town and Country) and Anne Zerr (R, St. Charles) said that they had worked with Governor Jay Nixon (D) on crafting an alternate proposal.  However, the press release contains no details on what's in it.  Zerr says she cannot disclose what's in the compromise because it's still being worked on.

Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

House and Senate negotiators have failed to reach an agreement on a congressional redistricting map before today’s self-imposed deadline.

Republican House leaders had wanted a compromise map ready to pass before Easter Weekend, in order to have time to override a potential veto from Democratic Governor Jay Nixon during the regular session.

Mo. Senate

The Missouri House has rejected the changes made to its redistricting map by the Senate, which on Wednesday took its own map and substituted it in the House bill before passing it.

The main sticking point appears to be how much of Jefferson County will fall into the rural southeastern Missouri congressional district.

Mo. House Communications

A State House committee’s plan to redraw Missouri’s congressional districts is drawing fire from both urban and rural residents and from both political parties.

The state is losing a seat in Congress based on the latest U.S. Census figures.

Pages