John Hicks

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for January 17 will be “The Career of John Hicks.”  Born in Atlanta, pianist John Hicks came to St. Louis at the age of 14.  Hicks went to high school with Lester Bowie and Oliver Lake.  He went to Lincoln University and the Berklee School of Music.  Hicks made his first recordings with Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers.  He soon became an in-demand pianist, playing with Betty Carter and David Murray in addition to leading his own groups.  This show will feature him with, in addition, Joe Lovano, Jay McShann, Booker Ervin, Nick Brignola, Ray Anderson, St.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited  for December 27, will be “The Keys and Strings Hour + New Music.”  The “Keys and Strings Hour” will present pianists Teddy Wilson, Dave Brubeck, Roger Kellaway, John Hicks, Ray Bryant, Toshiko Akiyoshi and Hampton Hawes in solo, duo, trio and quartet formats.  New music for December will be Scott Hamilton with the Jeff Hamilton Trio, Junior Mance, the Electric Squeezebox Orchestra, Carrie Wicks, A David Friesen & Glen Moore duet, vocalist Carrie Wicks, Amina Figarova, Chucho Valdes, Gary Bartz & the Heads of State, John Coltrane, Matthew Shipp, Orrin Evans a

Unknown / Courtesy of Richard Davis

Jazz Unlimited for December 13, 2015 will be “The Career of Richard Davis.”  Bassist Richard Davis was born in Chicago in 1930.  In high school, he studied with Captain Walter Dyett.  After college, he worked in dance bands and with Don Shirley.  He got to New York in 1954, playing with the Sauter-Finnegan Orchestra.  Davis accompanied Sarah Vaughan from 1957-1960.  During this time, he was building a studio career playing music of many genres.  His studio work included hit records by Laura Nyro (Smile) Bruce Springsteen (Born to Run) and Van Morrison (Astral Weeks

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for September 21 will be “The Music of John Coltrane.”  Saxophonist John Coltrane had the most formidable technique in jazz history.  His influence was so strong that for decades after his death, many saxophonists would base their work on just a six month period of his development.  This show will present music that Coltrane recorded and composed after his spiritual awakening in 1957 that was part of his recovery from heroin use.  Coltrane will be featured with his classic quartet, his quintet with Eric Dolphy, the Africa/Brass big band and with vocalist Johnny Hartman.  Play

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley