Kelly Glossip

Photo courtesy of Kelly Glossip

Updated at 10:05 a.m. Wednesday to correct Judge Teitelman's first name.

Updated with comments from the American Civil Liberties Union of Missouri.

The Missouri Supreme Court has ruled that a gay man whose longtime partner, a state trooper who was killed in the line of duty, is not eligible for the trooper's survivor benefits because the two were never married.

The Supreme Court of Missouri
via Flickr | david_shane

Should certain state benefits be limited only to married couples, even though that could discriminate against gays and lesbians in Missouri?

That's one of the questions the Missouri Supreme Court will be considering after hearing arguments today in the case of Kelly Glossip, whose partner, Cpl. Dennis Englehard, was killed in the line of duty as a state trooper.

Photo courtesy of Kelly Glossip

The Missouri Supreme Court will hear arguments on Wednesday in a case that began with the tragic line-of-duty death of a Missouri state trooper.

According to the state, Dennis Englehard left behind no survivors. But his partner of 15 years disagreed  - and sued to access the benefits he felt he was due. A district judge in Cole County rejected that request.

Kelly Glossip never thought he would be a gay rights activist.