Ken Warren

From left, Kathy Bernard, Lee Lyons, Jake Gray
Nathan Rubbelke |St. Louis Public Radio

Gene Hutchins is agitated. Alison Lamothe is concerned.

Ahead of Tuesday's Primary Elections in Illinois and Missouri, they represent just two of the many moods voters are expressing when it comes to the choices for president.

Saint Louis University professors Ness Sandoval and Ken Warren.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Saint Louis University professors Ken Warren, professor of political science, and Ness Sandoval, associate professor of sociology and anthropology, have been working diligently for the past several months to parse through data in a study about the different experiences St. Louis-area residents have had with municipal courts based on race and class.

Saint Louis University professor Ken Warren oversaw a municipal court poll this fall, where residents in rich and poor communities in the St. Louis region were asked about their experience.
Kameel Stanley / St. Louis Public Radio

A survey of more than 750 people shows big differences in the way residents in the St. Louis area experience municipal courts.

That’s according to a study by researchers at Saint Louis University, who spent the last couple months polling people paying traffic and municipal fines in wealthy and poor communities.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Although redistricting battles were finished a year ago, before the 2012 elections, the topic resurfaced with this month's U.S. House fight over the federal budget and Obamacare, which led to the 16-day shutdown of the federal government.


A week after the conservative losses at the polls, about 20 tea partiers gathered at a restaurant in North St. Louis County to listen to a few lecturers talk about a few ideas for the future: the flat tax and the fair tax. And yes, to commiserate about the recent past.

“If we can’t even elect a Republican president with Barack Obama as his opponent, how in God's name do we propose to eliminate the tax code?” Bill Hennessy, who helped found the St. Louis Tea Party, asked. He was visibly frustrated.

This Week's Politically Speaking Podcast

Nov 15, 2012

Chris McDaniel of St. Louis Public Radio joins Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum of the St. Louis Beacon to discuss a few political issues.

On this week's podcast: After the GOP's lackluster performance in Missouri's statewide races, what can the party do going forward? It's early, but ballot initiatives are already in discussion for 2014. And leadership positions have now been divvied out in the Missouri legislature. How will the Republican leaders work with Democratic Governor Jay Nixon?