Kevin Keith

(photos from the Missouri Department of Transportation)

The director of the Missouri Department of Transportation has abruptly stepped down.

Kevin Keith submitted his resignation to the Missouri Highways and Transportation Commission today. He'll take a medical leave of absence and retire on July 1.

Courtesy Missouri Department of Transportation

MoDOT Director: Wouldn't take public vote to rebuild I-70 using tolls


Mo. lawmakers considering I-70 toll proposals

Missouri Department of Transportation Director Kevin Keith told a panel of lawmakers Tuesday that changes to the interstate, such as widening it to six lanes, could create construction jobs and make the state more economically competitive. Keith said such improvements could cost as much as $4 billion.

Private companies would finance the project up front and collect tolls on I-70 between Kansas City and St. Louis.

UPI/Missouri Department of Highways and Transportation

The head of the Missouri Department of Transportation is hoping that 2012 will be a better year than this one. The agency had to make some pretty drastic budget decisions this year.

"It was hard," said MoDot Director Kevin Keith. "You know, that was the first word that comes to mind. It was hard."


A joint House-Senate committee in Jefferson City heard a proposal today for rebuilding Interstate Highway 70 in Missouri and turning it into a toll road. 

MoDOT Director Kevin Keith told the committee that charging tolls would provide the best opportunity to pay for rebuilding I-70.  But he acknowledges that it may not be an easy sell to lawmakers.

(Via Flickr/ KOMUnews, Manu Bhandari)

The Missouri Highways and Transportation Commission meets tomorrow to consider a proposal to restructure the Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) over the next five years.   

The controversial plan calls for laying off 1,200 MoDOT workers, closing 135 facilities and selling off 740 pieces of equipment.

(Missouri Department of Transportation)

Missouri's transportation director says the state is nearing a crisis in highway funding and may have to turn away federal dollars unless it comes up with more of its own money for roads.

Department Director Kevin Keith told The Associated Press on Monday the agency now believes it must make about $300 million in cost cuts to free up enough state money to match federal highway dollars over the next five years. The department last year had set a goal of $200 million of savings.