Lake of the Ozarks

Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

There'll be no waterskiing at the Lake of the Ozarks, at least maybe not till Saturday at the earliest.

The high-water level due to heavy rainfall has led Gov. Jay Nixon to declare the entire lake a "no-wake zone," meaning that boaters can travel no faster than basic idle speed.

(via Flickr/John Picken)

(Updated 3:50 p.m., June 16, 2015 with ruling from the Supreme Court.)

The Missouri Supreme Court has ruled that Ameren Missouri is not responsible for the deaths of two young children who drowned after being electrocuted on the Lake of the Ozarks.

Ameren owns the lake, which is part of its Osage power plant. Alexandra and Brayden Anderson were swimming in the lake on July 4, 2012, when they were shocked by a stray current from the family's dock and drowned. Their mother sued Ameren, saying the company regulated the installation of docks on the lake and was therefore liable for the deaths.

(via Flickr/John Picken)

A U.S. Representative from southwest Missouri wants to reduce federal authority over hydroelectric projects.

(via Flickr/John Picken)

CORRECTION: We incorrectly referred to Congresswoman Vicky Hartzler's press secretary as "Steve Schwartz" in an earlier version of this post. His name is Steve Walsh. We apologize for the error.

Updated at 3:12 p.m. and 4:45 p.m. with more details.

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission today approved Ameren Missouri's plan to reduce the amount of land the company owns and manages along the shoreline of the Lake of the Ozarks.

(via Flickr/John Picken)

A resolution voicing support for embattled homeowners at the Lake of the Ozarks was passed unanimously Tuesday by a Missouri House committee.

(via Flickr/John Picken)

Ameren Missouri has filed a plan with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) ensuring that some 1600 homes at the Lake of the Ozarks are not threatened with removal.

The plan revises the shoreline boundary so that most of the homes are not encroaching onto land that is part of Ameren’s Bagnell Dam hydroelectric project. Concerns were raised in July when FERC ordered that structures may need to be removed if they encroach onto the project’s land.

(via Flickr/John Picken)

Ameren Missouri says it plans to file a proposal early next year to resolve the controversy about the status of some homes and other buildings at the Lake of the Ozarks.

The lake is formed by a dam operated by Ameren. Some residents fear that structures built on land belonging to Ameren's hydroelectric project may have to be removed in light of a July decision by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

(via Flickr/John Picken)

Owners of waterfront property at the Lake of the Ozarks are breathing a sigh of relief this morning.

In July, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission issued an order that many structures built too close to the lake, including homes and apartment and condominium complexes, would have to be removed because they interfered with the operation of Ameren Missouri's Osage hydroelectric operation.

(via Flickr/John Picken)

Water samples taken this week from 12 coves at the Lake of the Ozarks did not contain elevated E. Coli levels, but two Missouri beaches will remain closed because of elevated average amounts of the bacteria.

All 12 samples are from coves in the lake's upper region, from the Highway 65 bridge to the Brown Bend area 30 miles down-lake.  Renee Bungart with the Department of Natural Resources says the upper-lake testing is part of a 5-year study to examine the Lake of the Ozark's ecological health.

(via Flickr/John Picken)

If you were planning on going swimming at three specific Missouri state beaches sometime soon, you may want to make other plans.

The Missouri Department of Natural Resources says "bacteria levels higher than those recommended for waters used for swimming" are the reason behind the temporary closing of beaches at:

  • Grand Glaize Beach, also known as Public Beach #2, at Lake of the Ozarks State Park
  • Public beaches at Mark Twain State Park
  • Public beaches at Harry S Truman State Park

Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster is taking steps he hopes will improve water quality at the Lake of the Ozarks, one of Missouri’s most popular tourist destinations.