Landmarks Association of St. Louis

The Superior Well Ticket office, constructed some time before 1915 is adjacent to one of the last intact mineral wells in the town at 610 Roosevelt Avenue. Excelsior Springs
Missouri Preservation

Updated with announcement - From bridges to a calaboose, the list of properties in peril put out by Missouri Preservation is a mix that highlights to variety and wealth of architecture that need help.

Getting the loudest reaction from the more than 100 people assembled for the occasion was the Clemens House on Cass Avenue.

historic preservation, Landmarks Association of St. Louis
(courtesy of Landmarks Association of St. Louis)

The Cupples 7 building in downtown St. Louis was on the National Register of Historic Places, but that didn’t save it from the wrecking ball.

The nine-story building was torn down in 2013 after becoming so unstable the city considered it a public safety risk.

In the wake of the demolition, Landmarks Association of St. Louis decided it was time to create a low-interest loan program for historic preservation.

Rosemary Straub Davison
Provided by the family

In July of 1991, Rosemary Davison took the keys and the deed to a home at 1067 Dunn Rd. in Florissant.

The two-story, red-brick farm house was built around 1860 by a German immigrant who had made his fortune during the California Gold Rush. Now, the house wasn’t fit to live in.

That didn’t matter to Ms. Davison. She wasn’t planning to live there. She was on a rescue mission.

With other members of Historic Florissant Inc., the nonprofit organization she helped found in 1969, Ms. Davison saved Gittemeier House from the wrecking ball.

The Palladium Building today
Preservation Research Office

There have been rumors for a couple of years now that the Veterans Administration is interested in obtaining the Palladium building at 3618 Enright in order to expand the John Cochran VA Medical Center. For years, the Palladium was home to The Plantation Club.

In a commentary published by St. Louis Public Radio and the Beacon, Pokey LaFarge called for the preservation of the building where jazz greats performed for decades.

(Landmarks Association of St. Louis/Andrew Weil)

Some familiar structures have returned to the the Landmarks Association of St. Louis's list of most endangered buildings in the region.

It's the 20th year the Association has published the list, which is designed to highlight 11 iconic or important buildings in danger of disappearing due to neglect or proposed demolition.

(screenshot via Google Maps)

Saying he has no choice, the owner of a crumbling building in the Cupples Station warehouse complex has applied for a permit to demolish the building.

Developer Kevin McGowan, who owns the building at 1014 Spruce St. known as Cupples 7, filed his application on Nov. 9th.  Streets around the building have been blocked off since late September due to safety concerns.

Every day, train cars and semi trucks leave St. Louis stacked high with pallets of bricks.  They head south to cities like New Orleans, to be reused in new construction. 

But those bricks leave at a cost to the city—they’re often stolen from buildings the city owns, damaging both the government’s investment and city’s historic heritage.  Mandi Rice takes us to one of those neighborhoods, and asks what the city government is doing to curb the problem.