lethal injection

St. Louis Public Radio reporter Chris McDaniel talks to 'St. Louis on the Air' host Don Marsh about investigative journalism on Feb. 10, 2015, at St. Louis Public Radio in St. Louis.
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

A few months ago, an investigative report by St. Louis Public Radio reporter Chris McDaniel revealed the state of Missouri was covertly using the drug midazolam before execution warrants were valid, and before witnesses were present to provide oversight. That story led to reforms in the state’s mostly secret execution policies.

via Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. Supreme Court announced Friday that it will hear a challenge to Oklahoma's lethal injection protocol. The case could have direct impact on Missouri in at least two ways.

First, it raises questions about the use of midazolam. Oklahoma uses the drug as the first step in its execution procedure. Missouri also has administered midazolam in large doses to inmates prior to execution, though the state has claimed the drug is not part of the execution procedure.

(via Wikimedia Commons/California Department of Corrections)

A Cole County judge is considering whether the state of Missouri needs to make more information public about the way it performs executions.

(via Wikimedia Commons/Glenn Francis, www.PacificProDigital.com)

The publisher of Hustler Magazine is asking a federal appeals court to allow him to get records filed as part of a legal challenge to Missouri's execution protocol.

file photo

Forty two years ago this week, St. Louis Public Radio began broadcasting from its home at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Coincidentally, those of us from the St. Louis Beacon, which merged with the station six months ago, are about to complete probation and become full-fledged UMSL employees.

Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

In a speech Thursday, Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster expressed concern over the execution secrecy that his office has previously fought hard to defend. The Democrat is calling on the state to create a state-run laboratory to produce the lethal injection drugs itself.

Koster says the expanding secrecy surrounding Missouri’s lethal injection methods should "concern all of us deeply.”

The announcement comes at a time when there are few willing suppliers, which Koster admitted in his speech.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

Two suits were filed Thursday in Jefferson City challenging Missouri officials for failing to disclose information about the drugs the state uses in lethal injections.

(Missouri Department of Corrections)

Update 7:52 a.m 11/20/13:

Missouri carried out the execution of Joseph Paul Franklin a little after 6 a.m. He was put to death after courts overturned Tuesday's stays of execution.

Yesterday, two federal judges issued stays of execution.

The judges took issue with how the state was getting its lethal injection drug from a secret source not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration, and questioned whether the inmate was mentally competent to be executed.

The state of Missouri, led by Attorney General Chris Koster, appealed quickly.

(via Wikimedia Commons/California Department of Corrections)

(Last updated Jan. 30, 2014)

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Last updated 1:30 p.m. Will be updated further.

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon has responded to the recent controversy surrounding the execution drug propofol by halting the execution of a Missouri inmate, and asking that a different form of lethal injection be used.

Here's Nixon's full statement: 

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