Lewis Reed

Esme Schumann, (left) Mark Overton and Susie Weinstein dig a hole the City Garden Montessori School in order to plant a new birch tree. In the background, Michael Powers and Aldermanic President Lewis Reed approach.
Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis region gained 500 native trees Sunday. People gathered in public spaces stretching from north St. Louis County to the south side of St. Louis, to plant the trees as part of “Plant for Peace.” The initiative was organized by the office of St. Louis Board of Aldermen President Lewis Reed.

Reed said his office wanted to do something that would bring communities together after Michael Brown was shot and killed by Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson on Aug. 9.

Rachel Lippmann / St. Louis Public Radio

Saturday's shooting death of Michael Brown in Ferguson resulted in overnight violence, including looting, arson and gunshots. As cleanup began Monday morning, so did discussions about the tension throughout the St. Louis area, the response in Ferguson, and the lack of information about Saturday’s shooting.

“There should be no need anywhere for a young man to lose his life,” said Ferguson Mayor James Knowles III. “We need to start talking about bridging the gap between law enforcement and the young people in the community.

(via Flickr/iChaz)

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen is unlikely to vote on a $200 million bond issue until after the August primary election. That's because Board president Lewis Reed put a temporary kibosh on bill by tabling any discussion of the issue.

Reed cited a litany of reasons for the delay, including the need to continue negotiations with the mayor's office and fine-tune the bill. 

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

A $200 million dollar city bond issue that would include some money for residents to repair their homes is on its way to the Board of Aldermen. But those funds likely won't be there for long.  

The whole debate started last week, when board president Lewis Reed unveiled a version of the bond issue that included a specific list of projects, such as $10 million in home repair funds.

Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio.

St. Louis officials are considering a $200 million bond issue, paid for by a property tax increase. The bond would go toward various building and road repairs, as well as vehicle and equipment upgrades for the fire and police departments.

The proposal would have to be approved by the voters, and the Board of Aldermen has decided to hold town hall meetings for taxpayers to voice their opinion on where the money should be spent.

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio and the Beacon

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio and the Beacon's Chris McDaniel, Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum talk about the week’s politics. 

St. Louis Comptroller Darlene Green joins the podcast this week. Green is the city's chief fiscal officer and one of the longest-serving comptrollers in modern history.

(courtesy of Housing and Urban Development department)

City officials are bullish about a comprehensive data analysis aimed at providing guidance to steer money more strategically for housing and community development programs.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development recently released a "market value analysis" of the city of St. Louis. It’s a snapshot that provides detailed information about foreclosures, housing prices, construction permits and commercial development around the city.

Jason Rosenbaum/St. Louis Public Radio

Updated 4:58 p.m. 1/10/13 with map of plow requests.

For the first time in recent memory, the city of St. Louis is plowing its residential streets. 

It’s a policy shift that came amid widespread complaints that the city did an inadequate job of cleaning up after Sunday’s snowstorm. 

(Jason Rosenbaum/St. Louis Beacon)

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon’s Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about the week’s politics. Pinch-hitting for Chris this week was St. Louis Public Radio's Rachel Lippmann.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Opponents of a proposed $250,000 consulting contract between the city of St. Louis water department and the French utility company Veolia call the latest move in the saga by Mayor Francis Slay “political chicanery."

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