Lieutenant governor

Mike Parson
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest edition of the Politically Speaking podcast, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies welcome back Republican lieutenant governor hopeful Mike Parson.

Parson, a state senator from Bolivar, won a hotly contested GOP primary for the lieutenant governorship against Bev Randles. He’s facing off against Democrat Russ Carnahan in the general election. Carnahan recorded an episode of Politically Speaking that will be posted later this week.

The candidates for lieutenant governor are Republican Mike Parson, left, and Democrat Russ Carnahan.
File photos | St. Louis Public Radio

For the first time in 12 years, someone besides Peter Kinder will be lieutenant governor of Missouri.

Kinder jumped into the governor's race and lost in a crowded Republican primary, coming in third in a contest won by Eric Greitens. The major party candidates on the Nov. 8 ballot are Democrat Russ Carnahan and Republican Mike Parson.

Top row, Russ Carnahan, Tommie Pierson, Winston Apple. Bottom row, Bev Randles, Mike Parson
Jason Rosenbaum and campaign photo

Let’s get something out of the way: Missouri’s lieutenant governor doesn’t have a lot of power or many defined responsibilities.

The lieutenant governor is charged with presiding over the Senate, serving on boards and commissions, and assuming the governorship if the state’s chief executive dies. That reality has often under whelmed people elected to the office: The late U.S. Sen. Thomas Eagleton once quipped that the lieutenant governor’s office is only good for standing at an office window and watching the Missouri River flow by.

Russ Carnahan
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest edition of the Politically Speaking podcast, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies are pleased to welcome former U.S. Rep. Russ Carnahan to the program.

The St. Louis Democrat recently declared his return to electoral politics when he announced his lieutenant governor bid.

Dr. Brad Bradshow is dropping his race to become the Democratic nominee for lieutenant governor.
Provided by Dr. Bradshaw

Democrat Brad Bradshaw is ending his campaign for lieutenant governor and ties his decision to former U.S. Rep. Russ Carnahan’s recent announcement that he’s jumping in.

Bradshaw, a physician and lawyer with offices in St. Louis and Springfield, also is halting his initiative-petition effort to legalize the medicinal use of marijuana.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay and other local leaders are endorsing Susan Montee in her campaign for Lieutenant Governor. None of the four Democrats in the race for the office are from St. Louis -- Missouri's largest voting bloc. Thus, Montee's endorsement from St. Louis city officials gives her a strong lead as she seeks the nomination.

Montee, the former state auditor, kicked off her campaign at St. Louis City Hall Tuesday saying she knows how to fight for veterans and seniors.

(website of Sen. Ridgeway)

Updated at 2 p.m. with information about potential third Democratic candidate.

The Republican primary for lieutenant governor of Missouri may get even more crowded.

State Sen. Luann Ridgeway, a Republican from the Kansas City area, said Monday she is "very committed" to the race, though she has not officially declared her candidacy.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

(Click on the link to hear Marshall Griffin's exclusive interview with Tilley)

The only major Republican contender in the Missouri Lt. Governor’s race has dropped out.

Steven Tilley of Perryville made the surprise announcement today (Thursday) to fellow House Republicans and to the media.  He says he made the decision after realizing that he wants to be a normal person again.

“It wasn’t in my heart to do it, I just didn’t have the fire in the belly," Tilley said.  "I started out because I wanted to do it, but I’ve sacrificed a lot to myself financially and to my family, and I’m comfortable…it’s a load off my shoulders and I’m excited to move into a new chapter.”

(St. Louis Public Radio)

Political observers say Missouri Lt. Governor Peter Kinder’s political future could be in jeopardy, if reports alleging his pursuit of a former stripper and nude model are true.

The St. Louis Riverfront Times published an interview with Tammy Chapman, who worked as a stripper in the St. Louis area in the 90’s and claimed that the then-State Senator was “one of her best customers.”