Linda Luebbering

Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

The latest figures show Missouri revenues are down in some key categories.

The state collected roughly $506.9 million last month, compared to $512.9 million in July 2014, a drop of 1.2 percent.  State Budget Director Linda Luebbering says it's due in part to fraud prevention measures at the federal level.

(via Flickr/Tracy O)

Missouri's financial picture looks much better today than it did a year ago at this time.

The latest revenue figures show tax collections increased by 8.8 percent during Fiscal Year 2015, which ended Tuesday.

Missouri Budget Director Linda Luebbering shares a laugh with Gov. Jay Nixon when she was asked about working for different governors.
Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

With the state of Missouri’s budget challenges easing, state budget chief Linda Luebbering has decided that it’s time to retire.

That announcement, made Wednesday by Gov. Jay Nixon, sent shock waves through the state Capitol, where Luebbering long has been known for her candor and accessibility.

(via Flickr/Tracy O)

Missouri may not be rolling in the dough, but as the state’s fiscal year winds to a close, the state’s finances are in undeniably good shape.

“Revenues are looking pretty good,’’ said Linda Luebbering, Missouri's budget director.

That picture is in sharp contrast to the very public budget woes plaguing two of the state’s neighbors, Kansas and Illinois. Both states have been embroiled in battles for weeks over too little income to cover their basic spending needs.

With permission of Marie French | St. Louis Post-Dispatch | 2014

The Missouri General Assembly’s early action on the state budget – approving it two weeks ahead of schedule – sets the stage for a particularly frantic last week of the legislative session.

It also effectively ends the chance for expansion of Medicaid in Missouri during the three-year period that the federal government would pick up the whole tab.

a rolling dollar bill
dleafy |

After months of lower-than-hoped-for revenue collections, Missouri's state government saw an unexpected boost in income in December.  And that could result in lower tensions over money in the Capitol.

State income – primarily taxes – rose 10.7 percent in December, compared to the same period a year ago.  The chief reason: higher collections in individual income taxes and sales taxes.

New numbers show Missouri's women who worked full-time earned about 78 percent of men's earnings in 2013.
(via Flickr/Tax Credits)

Gov. Jay Nixon’s recent public tour of the damaged sections of the Missouri Capitol appeared to be aimed, in part, at making it clear that he recognizes repairs are needed – even as he continues to withhold repair money allocated in the current state budget.

Nixon also may be attempting to repair his strained relations with legislative leaders, as his administration and the General Assembly launch into a new round of negotiations and maneuverings to craft a new state budget for the next fiscal year (FY2016).

Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri state government is seeing an increase in general-revenue income but not enough to cover its budget for the current fiscal year.

That’s the assessment of state Budget Director Linda Luebbering of the state’s latest income numbers, released Thursday.

Since the fiscal year began July 1, general revenue collections are up 3.8 percent compared to the same period a year ago. If that percentage remained throughout the fiscal year, the state would be about $100 million short of meeting its budget, requiring last-minute cuts by Gov. Jay Nixon.

stacks of money

The state of Missouri’s individual income tax collections are up, but the state’s income from sales taxes are lagging well behind.

And overall, the state isn’t collecting enough money to cover all the budget items that the General Assembly approved this spring.

That’s how state Budget Director Linda Luebbering interprets the latest state revenue numbers for August, which were released Wednesday.

New numbers show Missouri's women who worked full-time earned about 78 percent of men's earnings in 2013.
(via Flickr/Tax Credits)

Missouri is beginning its new fiscal year on an upswing, with general-revenue income for July – the first month of the fiscal year – up 6.5 percent compared to a year ago.

But state Budget Director Linda Luebbering cautions that state government income is still below where it needs to be if it is to hit the General Assembly’s estimates that legislators used to assemble their approved budget.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon is trying a new pitch in his quest to persuade state legislators to expand the state's Medicaid program and accept the $2 billion a year in extra federal money that would go along with it.

Nixon told supporters Thursday night in St. Louis County that the state’s current Medicaid program is so stingy that it discourages people from working — and could drive entry-level workers to other states that are expanding Medicaid.

Missouri now bars Medicaid coverage for anyone who earns more than $2,217 a year — which boils down to $42.63 a week.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon’s decision to release $132 million withheld from the current budget was influenced, in part, by the rosier state revenue collections in February, his budget chief says.

State Budget Director Linda Luebbering announced Tuesday that net general revenue collections for February shot up 17.3 percent ($69 million), compared to February 2013.   That strong showing follows several months of less-than-stellar revenue numbers, particularly in January.

a rolling dollar bill
dleafy |

Missourians flocked to the stores in December, causing a huge increase in the state’s sales tax collections that, in turn, has helped fatten the state government’s coffers more than expected.

State Budget Director Linda Luebbering on Thursday credited a rosier public mood – which apparently led to more holiday shopping – for a  25.9 percent increase in Missouri’s sales tax collections in December, compared to December 2012.

Missouri Capitol building
Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

(Updated 1:20 a.m. Friday, Dec. 20)

Missouri legislative leaders and Gov. Jay Nixon are disagreeing on what revenue estimates should be used in drawing up the state budget for the coming fiscal year – an argument that could affect the General Assembly’s deliberations when it goes back into session in a few weeks.

But the specifics of the budget dispute aren’t clear because most of the parties involved are commenting only through press releases and offering -- at least so far -- few additional details.

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - Even as the Missouri General Assembly considers tax breaks for Boeing, the latest state revenue numbers indicate a slowdown in the state’s economic recovery.

Missouri’s general revenue collections for November were up only 1 percent, compared to November 2012, putting the fiscal year-to-date increase slightly below what had been estimated when the General Assembly and Gov. Jay Nixon’s staff crafted the state’s current budget.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - Missouri state government is seeing its coffers continue to grow – although arguably at a slower pace -- thanks to continued increases in individual and corporate income tax collections, plus a bump in sales taxes.

In essence, that’s the portrait painted by the state’s latest revenue numbers released Monday.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Gov. Jay Nixon withheld nearly $400 million from the state’s 2014 budget, a move he attributed to uncertainty over a veto override of tax cut legislation.

Nixon, a Democrat, made the announcement in Jefferson City after signing bills on the state’s roughly $25 billion budget. In a statement, the governor said that he made the withholds because Republican lawmakers may try to override a tax cut bill – House Bill 253 – later this fall. Among other things, that bill cuts personal income, corporate and business taxes.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated at 4:55 p.m. with quotes from Gov. Nixon, Budget Dir. Luebbering, and several GOP legislative leaders.

Citing concerns that lawmakers will override his veto of an income tax bill, Governor Jay Nixon (D) announced today that he's frozen more than $400 million in spending from the state's budget for next year.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Governor Jay Nixon has launched a major public effort to support his veto last week of a bill that would have cut Missouri's individual and corporate income taxes.

The Democratic Governor appeared before college and university officials Tuesday morning in Jefferson City, telling them that the GOP-backed proposal is the single greatest threat to public education he's seen in his career.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Growth may be slowing, but the Missouri’s revenue stream continues to flow heavier than expected.

The latest numbers released today by state Budget Director Linda Luebbering, show that Missouri’s general-revenue collections for the current fiscal year are running at a pace that’s up 8.3 percent overall, compared to a year ago.


While 2013 began just a few days ago, Missouri's Fiscal Year is now half-over, and so far officials say it's been a good one.

The latest numbers from Governor Jay Nixon's Budget Office show a 7.9 percent increase in revenue collections from July to December, as compared to the same 6-month period a year ago. 

At that time, the Show-Me State had collected around $3.49 billion in revenues.  A year later, collections stand at $3.77 billion.  Budget Director Linda Luebbering credits an improved economy.


If officials in Washington don't reach a deal to avert the "fiscal cliff," Missouri could see a hit to its economy and budget.

The Federal Funds Information for States estimates Missouri could lose $1 billion of Defense Department spending on contracts and military institutions if federal spending cuts take effect in the new year. The Washington-based organization estimates those automatic cuts also could result in a $125 million reduction in federal grants to state programs, such as public schools and early childhood programs.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Governor Jay Nixon (D) has decided to let state employees take the day after Thanksgiving off work this year.

The state’s latest general revenue report show that Missouri collected 7.5 percent more money last month than it did in October of last year, and State Budget Director Linda Luebbering says that’s part of the reason why state workers will get to stay home on November 23rd.

Governor Jay Nixon (D) has signed Missouri’s $24 billion budget into law, but he also sliced $15 million from next year’s spending plan.

Missouri’s revenues rose more than expected during the month of May.

The state collected about $6.6 billion in revenue last month, compared to just under $6.4 billion in May of 2011.  Governor Jay Nixon’s Budget Director, Linda Luebbering, credits most of the improvement to higher collections of state income and sales taxes.

“That's the good news, things are picking up,"  Luebbering said.  "I think we do have to be cautious, still, because of what’s going on at the national and particularly the international picture, with European Union issues and everything that's going on globally that could have some bearing on the overall economy.”

(via Flickr/yomanimus)

Missouri is planning to refinance more than $500 million of debt as part of Gov. Jay Nixon's plan to balance the state budget.

Nixon's budget proposal for the next fiscal year assumes the state will save $41 million from the debt restructuring.

The governor's budget office says the state already has refinanced $20 million of principal from the debt used to build Mizzou Arena at the University of Missouri-Columbia.

(via Flickr/_J_D_R)

Halfway through Missouri's budget year, state revenues are sluggish.

The state budget office reported Thursday that Missouri's revenue increased 1.2 percent through the first six months of the 2012 fiscal year. Revenues need to grow at about 2.7 percent to meet the mark set by the budget.

Budget Director Linda Luebbering says the revenue report was "concerning." But she noted that the revenue could improve in the second half of the budget year. Missouri budgets take effect July 1.

(via Flickr/jennlynndesign)

Missouri lawmakers will be trying to plug a half-billion-dollar gap in next year's budget when they convene their 2012 session on Wednesday.

State budget director Linda Luebbering says much of the hole is due to a reduction in federal money, such as stimulus funds and Medicaid payments.  However, State Senator David Pearce (R, Warrensburg) suggests that that number is not set in stone.

“There are predictions anywhere from $400 to $900 million, (that could) be our shortfall for this upcoming year," Pearce said.  "How do you fill that?  It’s gonna be tough.” 

(via Flickr/_J_D_R)

Missouri tax revenues have increased this year but are falling short of what was expected in the state's budget.

The state Office of Administration reported Friday that state revenues through November increased 2 percent, to $2.84 billion from $2.78 billion last year. So far, sales tax collections are up 3.4 percent but corporate income taxes are down 10.7 percent.


Mo. Gross Revenue Up Slightly

Missouri’s gross revenue collection in July was up by .6 percent as compared to July 2010.

The revenue increase is driven by strong individual income tax collection, which was up 9.3 percent over the same time last year. Sales taxes remain stagnant, according to state budget director Linda Luebbering. She blames low sales tax collection on a stubbornly high unemployment rate.