Linda Luebbering

(via Flickr/Tracy O)

Missouri's financial picture looks much better today than it did a year ago at this time.

The latest revenue figures show tax collections increased by 8.8 percent during Fiscal Year 2015, which ended Tuesday.

Missouri Budget Director Linda Luebbering shares a laugh with Gov. Jay Nixon when she was asked about working for different governors.
Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

With the state of Missouri’s budget challenges easing, state budget chief Linda Luebbering has decided that it’s time to retire.

That announcement, made Wednesday by Gov. Jay Nixon, sent shock waves through the state Capitol, where Luebbering long has been known for her candor and accessibility.

(via Flickr/Tracy O)

Missouri may not be rolling in the dough, but as the state’s fiscal year winds to a close, the state’s finances are in undeniably good shape.

“Revenues are looking pretty good,’’ said Linda Luebbering, Missouri's budget director.

That picture is in sharp contrast to the very public budget woes plaguing two of the state’s neighbors, Kansas and Illinois. Both states have been embroiled in battles for weeks over too little income to cover their basic spending needs.

Marie French | St. Louis Post-Dispatch | 2014

The Missouri General Assembly’s early action on the state budget – approving it two weeks ahead of schedule – sets the stage for a particularly frantic last week of the legislative session.

It also effectively ends the chance for expansion of Medicaid in Missouri during the three-year period that the federal government would pick up the whole tab.

a rolling dollar bill
dleafy | sxc.hu

After months of lower-than-hoped-for revenue collections, Missouri's state government saw an unexpected boost in income in December.  And that could result in lower tensions over money in the Capitol.

State income – primarily taxes – rose 10.7 percent in December, compared to the same period a year ago.  The chief reason: higher collections in individual income taxes and sales taxes.

New numbers show Missouri's women who worked full-time earned about 78 percent of men's earnings in 2013.
(via Flickr/Tax Credits)

Gov. Jay Nixon’s recent public tour of the damaged sections of the Missouri Capitol appeared to be aimed, in part, at making it clear that he recognizes repairs are needed – even as he continues to withhold repair money allocated in the current state budget.

Nixon also may be attempting to repair his strained relations with legislative leaders, as his administration and the General Assembly launch into a new round of negotiations and maneuverings to craft a new state budget for the next fiscal year (FY2016).

Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri state government is seeing an increase in general-revenue income but not enough to cover its budget for the current fiscal year.

That’s the assessment of state Budget Director Linda Luebbering of the state’s latest income numbers, released Thursday.

Since the fiscal year began July 1, general revenue collections are up 3.8 percent compared to the same period a year ago. If that percentage remained throughout the fiscal year, the state would be about $100 million short of meeting its budget, requiring last-minute cuts by Gov. Jay Nixon.

stacks of money
sxc.hu

The state of Missouri’s individual income tax collections are up, but the state’s income from sales taxes are lagging well behind.

And overall, the state isn’t collecting enough money to cover all the budget items that the General Assembly approved this spring.

That’s how state Budget Director Linda Luebbering interprets the latest state revenue numbers for August, which were released Wednesday.

New numbers show Missouri's women who worked full-time earned about 78 percent of men's earnings in 2013.
(via Flickr/Tax Credits)

Missouri is beginning its new fiscal year on an upswing, with general-revenue income for July – the first month of the fiscal year – up 6.5 percent compared to a year ago.

But state Budget Director Linda Luebbering cautions that state government income is still below where it needs to be if it is to hit the General Assembly’s estimates that legislators used to assemble their approved budget.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon is trying a new pitch in his quest to persuade state legislators to expand the state's Medicaid program and accept the $2 billion a year in extra federal money that would go along with it.

Nixon told supporters Thursday night in St. Louis County that the state’s current Medicaid program is so stingy that it discourages people from working — and could drive entry-level workers to other states that are expanding Medicaid.

Missouri now bars Medicaid coverage for anyone who earns more than $2,217 a year — which boils down to $42.63 a week.

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