McCoy Tyner

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited show for Sunday, April 5 will be “The Music of Joe Henderson-Part 2.”   Tenor saxophonist Joe Henderson was comfortable playing with musicians whose styles ranged from hard bop to avant-garde.  In Part 2 of the music of Joe Henderson, we will hear him with Kenny Dorham, Herbie Hancock, Chick Corea, McCoy Tyner, Lee Konitz, the Thad Jones/Mel Lewis Jazz Orchestra, Bebop and Beyond, John Scofield, Freddie Hubbard and his own groups.

The Slide Show contains my photographs of some of the musicians heard on this show.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for SUnday, December 7 will be  “The Fifty Year Anniversary of the Recording of “A Love Supreme.”  On December 9, 1964, the John Coltrane Quartet entered Rudy Van Gelder’s studio with almost no written music but for a few sketches and what looked like a handwritten poem.  They proceeded to record the album “A Love Supreme,” one of the most important and best selling albums in jazz.  Since that time, three other versions of the work have been recorded along with interpretations of various sections by a number of artists.  We will hear these interpretations played by the Conrad

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for September 21 will be “The Music of John Coltrane.”  Saxophonist John Coltrane had the most formidable technique in jazz history.  His influence was so strong that for decades after his death, many saxophonists would base their work on just a six month period of his development.  This show will present music that Coltrane recorded and composed after his spiritual awakening in 1957 that was part of his recovery from heroin use.  Coltrane will be featured with his classic quartet, his quintet with Eric Dolphy, the Africa/Brass big band and with vocalist Johnny Hartman.  Play

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for March 2, 2014 will be “Live Jazz from Other New York Venues, Part 1.”  Jazz played live is a different animal from jazz recorded in the emotionally sterile confines of a studio.  The energy and emotion reflected back from an audience to the performers brings about better performances.  We continue our survey of New York venues with smaller clubs and Lincoln Center as well as presenting music from clubs that we did not have time for on earlier shows.  We will feature duets between Dick Wellstood and Kenny Davern, Dick Hyman and Roger Kellaway and Joe Lovano and Hank Jones

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for Sunday, December 1st will be “Live Jazz from Town Hall, New York City.”  We continue playing live music from the jazz capital of the world with concerts from Town Hall that span the years 1944 to 1990.  The artists featured are Eddie Condon and His All-Stars, Louis Armstrong and the All-Stars, the Dizzy Gillespie-Charlie Parker Quintet, four pieces from a Baron Timmie Rosenkranz concert in 1945, which includes the classic “I Got Rhythm” duet of Don Byas and Slam Stewart, Mary Lou Williams’ “Zodiac Suite,” Benny Carter, Red Norvo and Teddy Wilson, Thelonious Monk, the Chic

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for October 20 will be “The Career of Drummer Lewis Nash.” Born in 1958 in Phoenix, Arizona, Nash was a professional by 1976.  He moved to New York in 1981 and has become one of the most recorded drummers in jazz, even surpassing the recordings of Art Blakey and Max Roach, according to the Tom Lord Discography.  We will present about five percent of his recorded output on Jazz Unlimited.  Nash is a drummer for all styles and seasons, being equally at home in styles that range from swing to bebop, hard bop, free bop and structured abstract improvisation.  We will feature him w

Dennis C. Ows;ey / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited on Sunday evening, September 15 will feature “John Coltrane in His Own Words and Music.”   During his career, John Coltrane gave only a few interviews to jazz journalists.  He was a quiet, humble man who was very guarded.  Until now, only transcripts existed of these interviews.  Two well-known interviews with August Blume (1958) and Frank Kofsky (1966) have recently been issued in audio form.  These interviews, along with a short 1960 audio interview from Stockholm and a short 1966 interview from Japan will provide a different look at this jazz giant.  In addition, we will p