media literacy

Larry Morris, left, and Art Silverblatt talk to ‘St. Louis on the Air’ host Don Marsh about media literacy and critical thinking on Feb. 26, 2015.
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

You’ve likely seen Facebook or Twitter posts from friends or family members that link to information that seems almost but not quite plausible. Those stories often are about politicians; recently several surfaced that purported to be about Michael Brown. How can you figure out if the video or story is real or not? It comes down to critical thinking and media literacy.

Gateway Media Literacy Partners

New types of media, including social media, are changing the media landscape, but aren’t changing the need for media literacy.

“We define media literacy at Project Look Sharp as the ability to access, analyze, evaluate and create media,” Sox Sperry told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh on Monday. Sperry is director of curriculum and staff development at Project Look Sharp, a media literacy initiative at Ithaca College in New York.