Medical Education | St. Louis Public Radio

Medical Education

First-year Washington University medical school students board a school bus after a stop on a trip around St. Louis in August.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Every year, for the past 15 years, first year students at Washington University’s School of Medicine have climbed on board three yellow school buses and headed north. They take a route that passes through the city’s poorest neighborhoods, in a bid to introduce medical students to the lives of their future patients.

It’s a trip the school hopes will make them better doctors.

No organizations St. Louis Public Radio spoke with said they have heard many cases of men who would be eligible to donate under the new FDA recommendations being turned away.
LCpl Austin Schlosser | US Army

April is organ donation month and two guests joined St. Louis on the Air to discuss new advances in the field of organ donation research.

Nationwide, there are hundreds of thousands on various waiting lists for organ transplants. In the St. Louis area, there 200-250 patients waiting for a liver transplant and 1,300 patients waiting for a kidney transplant.

The guests also discussed the importance of organ donation, signing up to donate while living and also after death. Here’s who joined us for the discussion:

Kathy Smith, Miriam Steinberg, and Max Rosen are 4th year students at Washington University's School of Medicine.
Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

Like many states, Missouri is facing a doctor shortage.

The supply of doctors isn't keeping up, even as the population ages and more people have health insurance to pay for medical care. The American Association of Medical Colleges estimates that the country will have a void of about 90,000 physicians by 2020—half of them in primary care.

A view of Saint Louis University Hospital, taken 02/23/15.
Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

Citing the projected demand for primary care physicians in underserved areas, a California-based foundation is donating $6.6 million to Saint Louis University’s School of Medicine.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: July 24, 2008-  Rikiyah McGee bit her lip as she deftly handled the scalpel. Wearing medical gloves and working with a partner, she navigated the landscape of a sheep's brain. She cut the brain in half and sliced the sheep's cerebellum, identifying the leafy pattern white matter makes on gray matter, now grinning. One might even say that she had a surgeon's touch.