St. Louis International Film Festival

For years, Dr. Susan Mackinnon, a professor and plastic surgeon with Washington University, has been working to restore movement in paralyzed limbs through a specialized peripheral-nerve-transfer surgery. Now, her work is coming to light through a documentary screening at the St. Louis International Film Festival next week: “A Spark of Nerve.”

Damon Tweedy

In 2014, the Association of American Medical Colleges found that 4 percent of the nation’s physicians are African American. That’s compared with 13 percent of the total U.S. population. White physicians, on the other hand, make up 48.9 percent of the profession.

Candles are set out and numbered for each table's cadaver. Every candle was lit by students before the appreciation ceremony began.
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

For almost a decade students from Washington University School of Medicine’s first year gross anatomy class have held a ceremony honoring their “first patients.” These patients are people who donated their bodies to the medical school for this purpose.

First year medical student, Jorge Zarate, 22, respects the knowledge he’s gained from learning anatomy from a cadaver and wants to honor the people who donated their bodies.

(Kristi Luther/St. Louis Public Radio)

Senator Roy Blunt of Missouri visited Mercy Hospital in St. Louis Monday to speak with healthcare workers about the implications of federal healthcare changes. He also received a tour of the hospital's Telehealth Services, often used to serve rural communities that don't have access to specialty or intensive care. 

Mercy SafeWatch is an electronic Intensive Care Unit(e-ICU) that serves Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma and Arkansas. Blunt learned how Mercy is able to provide an extra set of eyes and ears for doctors that can't always be there in person.

Adam Procter / Flickr

A University of Missouri researcher is one of only a dozen recipients of this year’s National Medal of Science, announced by President Barack Obama Thursday.

Frederick Hawthorne is the director of the International Institute of Nano and Molecular Medicine at MU, and will be receiving the nation’s highest honor for scientists.The University says the Institute “was created largely to facilitate Hawthorne’s research” with the chemical element Boron.  

Washington University School of Medicine

Washington University School of Medicine has received a $50 million federal grant aimed at turning research findings into improvements in human health.

The grant is the renewal of an award from the National Institutes of Health. It will support Wash U's Institute of Clinical and Translational Sciences (ICTS), one of 60 such centers in the U.S.

(via Flickr/ellie)

Good morning! Here are some of today's starting headlines (other than yesterday's World Series rally):

Cold pill sales jump after new law in St. Charles County

Now that St. Charles County requires a prescription to purchase cold pills containing a key ingredient to methamphetamine, sales of the over-the-counter medications are soaring in three nearby St. Louis County towns.

(Courtesy Missouri Department of Agriculture)

The state of Missouri is paying tribute Thursday to State Veterinarian Dr. Taylor Woods on the opening day of the State Fair in Sedalia.  Woods has served as the State Veterinarian twice, collectively serving for nearly 20 years. 

During that time, he’s been credited with developing policy and procedures to combat numerous diseases that threaten Missouri’s livestock industry.  Dr. Woods sat down this week with St. Louis Public Radio’s Marshall Griffin and talked about just what it is that a State Veterinarian does. You can listen to their conversation above.


An industry group representing manufacturers of over-the-counter drugs has begun running radio ads against a Missouri proposal requiring a doctor's prescription to buy certain cold medicines.

The legislation is aimed at medications containing pseudoephedrine, which is a key ingredient for methamphetamine. Supporters hope to cut down on Missouri's meth production by making it harder for people to get ahold of pseudoephedrine.

(Flickr Creative Commons user whiskeyandtears)

A new study has found that over-the-counter children's medications aren't labeled the way they should be.
The research led by the New York University School of Medicine examined two-hundred top-selling liquid medications for children, to see whether they included a dosing device, like a cup, spoon, or syringe.
If they did, the researchers compared the measurement markings on the device to the dosing instructions on the product's label.
Lead author Dr. Shonna Yin says about a quarter of the products had no dosing device at all.

Emily Isaacs loves playing soccer so much that it hurts.

For many of the home visits, Jamry uses a team of nurses, shown here in his office during a weekly meeting to go over cases.
Hodiah Nemes | Beacon intern

For 15 years, Dr. William Gee operated a solo medical practice in St. Louis. "It was going quite well," Gee says. But Gee was busy, a little too busy. He felt "pressure to see more and more patients with less and less time" and experienced mounting overhead costs.

"I got tired of that," Gee said.

Women who are diagnosed with breast cancer may soon be helped by a discovery made in 1880 by Alexander Graham Bell.