Meramec River

(via Flickr/paparutzi)

Updated 3:27 p.m. to correct Combs current age. He is 43 years old.

A man who gave alcohol to minors during an outing along the Meramec River during which one of them drowned will spend a year in jail for his crime.

Courtesy the Open Spaces Council

Volunteers in St. Louis and eastern Missouri spent the weekend sprucing up 500 miles of the Meramec River and its tributaries.

From tires to an old sink, teams hauled away boat loads of junk, literally.

Callie Walla is the event and volunteer coordinator for The Open Space Council, which organized the event.

She said the low water level brought on by the lingering drought made it easier and safer for everyone.

(via Flickr/paparutzi)

An autopsy has determined that a St. Louis County boy found dead in the Meramec River drowned.

The body of 12-year-old Christopher Marks of Affton was recovered Tuesday afternoon about six miles downstream from where a search began. He had been missing since Sunday while on an outing with relatives in a conservation area.

(via Flickr/paparutzi)

The St. Louis County Police have confirmed that a body pulled from the Meramec River earlier this afternoon is that of a missing Affton boy.

(via Flickr/Sterlic)

Updated at 2:05 p.m. July 3:

As of 1:30 p.m., the boil order that had been in effect for 8,000 Missouri American Water customers in south St. Louis County was lifted. The utility is recommending that customers in the affected area flush their plumbing by letting faucets run for a few minutes.

The affected ZIP codes were:

  • St. Louis County portions of 63026
  • St. Louis County portions of 63049
  • Portions of 63088 that are south of the Meramec River.

(via Flickr/clip works)

This week’s heavy rainfall has increased the potential for isolated floods in portions of the state, although no major flooding is expected. 

Right now, a flood warning is in effect for the Meramec River in St. Louis County, which could lead to some local street flooding. 

John Campbell, operations chief for the State Emergency Management Agency explains why, and where, the flooding could occur.