Metro Theater Company

Julia Flood, the artistic director of Metro Theater Company, and Trigney Morgan, who plays Cassius Clay in “And In This Corner…Cassius Clay.”
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Picture this moment: A Louisville mother and her two sons are huddled in a hug after hearing the news about the murder of Emmett Till. There are tough questions about why and no clear answers to be had.

The cast of 'Afflicted: Daughters of Salem,' from left: Taylor Seward, Emily Jackoway, Alicia Smith, Jennifer Theby-Quinn, Samantha Moyer and Jacqueline Thompson.
Courtesy of the Metro Theater Company

In the spring of 1692, a group of young girls in Massachusetts spawned a wave of hysteria after accusing others of witchcraft. The accusations led to the Salem Witch Trials and the execution of more than a dozen people, mostly women.

Beginning Friday, Metro Theater Company and the Missouri History Museum present "Afflicted: Daughters of Salem," a play about the events that led to the Salem Witch Trials.

"Cityscape" host Steve Potter talked with Julia Flood, artistic director of Metro Theater Company, and playwright, Laurie Brooks.

scene from the play of oddly costumed actors
Provided by Metro Theatre

Can girls have short hair that isn’t a hairstyle? Can boys try on tutus? In ways both overt and subtle, society often says they can’t, or at least, they shouldn’t.

Metro Theater Company

Since the 1970s, Metro Theater Company has been performing thought-provoking, and often original, works for young audiences in St. Louis and beyond.

Currently the company is touring area schools and stages performing “Unsorted” by Wesley Middleton. The forty-minute drama explores themes of identity and belonging through characters that personify pieces of clothing.

Metro Theater Company Artistic Director Julia Flood and Old Bonhomme Elementary School teacher Lori Humphrey joined Cityscape host Steve Potter in studio to discuss the play.

Once upon a time, there was a world where the color pink peacefully coexisted with the ability to fix toys with motors.

In Wesley Middleton’s play in progress called “Unsorted,” characters Sweater, Slacks and Swimsuit dance happily together. But when Jacket demands the “clothings” be divided into Zums and Zing Zings, they become confused, and worry about which pieces of themselves they’ll have to cut off.

Wikimedia Commons / Library of Congress

Jackie Robinson was a baseball player who broke the so-called “color barrier,” becoming the first African American player in Major League Baseball’s modern era.

He debuted with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947.

St. Louis’ Metro Theater Company presents a play about the life of Jackie Robinson called Jackie and Me.

The production follows Joey Stoshack, a boy who discovers a rare baseball card is his ticket to travel back in time to Branch Rickey’s office on the day Robinson becomes an MLB player.

Less than a week into 2011, St. Louis theater goers have two brand new productions to take in, both St. Louis premiers.  We had the chance to preview both today on Cityscape.