Michael Allen

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

At the second meeting of the Ferguson Commission, St. Louis Police Chief Sam Dotson was supposed to make a multi-faceted presentation on policing – and what changes were being contemplated for his department.

But Dotson’s plans changed in a hurry. He faced intense public antagonism at Monday’s meeting, which focused on the relationship between citizens and police.

Michael Allen / Preservation Research Office

A five-day symposium with a funny name wants to promote environmental and sustainability awareness in the Midwest.

The Marfa Dialogues, which ends Sunday at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, includes several activities to highlight creative approaches to addressing environmental issues.

Architectural historian Michael Allen and installation artist Carlie Trosclair are creating an installation today that highlights urban demolition in St. Louis, “30 Days of Demolition.”

(Maria Altman/St. Louis Public Radio)

A huge redevelopment project on St. Louis’ north side has been in a holding pattern for years.

A lawsuit challenged the city’s authorization of millions of dollars in tax incentives for the 1,500-acre development “Northside Regeneration.”

The Missouri Supreme Court could rule on the case as early as Tuesday.

But as St. Louis Public Radio’s Maria Altman reports, the years of waiting for work to begin have left questions about whether developer Paul McKee can really pull off his expansive plan.

The Mark Twain Connection

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

A new Starbucks opened Friday in a Midtown St. Louis building often called the 'flying saucer.'

The modern building faced an uncertain future last year when Del Taco closed and the developer Rick Yackey wanted to tear it down.

Preservationists and even some politicians fought for the saucer, and Yackey changed his mind, instead luring national tenants.

St. Louis architectural historian Michael Allen says it was a big save.

Michael Allen, Preservation Research Office


2011 was an excellent year for historic preservation in the region, and here are some of the reasons why.

The historic entrance arch to the Lewis Place neighborhood, which will receive state aid nearly a year after a tornado damaged 91 homes in the area.
Adam Allington | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis is freeing up $1 million dollars to fund repairs to a historic north side neighborhood damaged in last year’s New Years Eve tornado.

The storm damage in St. Louis was not enough to qualify for federal disaster aid.

City officials announced on Monday that uninsured property owners on Lewis Place could qualify for up to $30,000 for repairs.

The storm damaged roughly 150 buildings on Lewis Place, a site know for its lush green median and historic footnote in St. Louis’ Civil Rights struggle.