Michael Brown | St. Louis Public Radio

Michael Brown

Protesters and police after shooting on the one year anniversary of Michael Brown's death
Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated as of Mon., August 10, 2015 at 3:45 p.m. with father's statement, originally updated at 1 p.m.

The man who St. Louis County Police say was shot by detectives after he fired on them Sunday night near protests in Ferguson has been identified as Tyrone Harris, 18, of Northwoods, according to the police department.

Harris has been charged with four counts of assault on law enforcement in the first degree, five counts of armed criminal action, and one count of discharging or shooting a firearm at a motor vehicle. A cash only bond has been set at $250,000.

A young girl walks near a memorial for Michael Brown. Hundreds of people converged near the spot where Brown was killed to honor the 18-year-old
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

Sunday was the first time Erica Garner stepped foot in Ferguson.

She’s the daughter of Eric Garner, a man who was choked to death by a New York police officer. She ventured to the St. Louis region to pay tribute to Michael Brown, the 18-year-old who became a symbol for a growing movement to change policing.

Michael Brown Sr, family and supporters march 4.8 miles from Ferguson to Normandy High School on Saturday, Aug. 9, 2015.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Surrounded by family, supporters and media, Michael Brown Sr. laid down a teddy bear on the middle of Canfield Dr. Saturday morning before leading the crowd on a 4.8 mile march from Ferguson to Normandy High School.  Sunday marks a year since his son, Michael Brown Jr., was shot and killed by then Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson.

The length of the march was chosen as a reference to the four and a half hours Brown’s body lay on Canfield Dr. on August 9, 2014.

The makeshift memorial for VonDerrit Myers Jr. at Shaw and Klemm in south St. Louis
Dale Singer | St. Louis Public Radio

On a weekend when the major focus will be on the anniversary of the death of Michael Brown Jr. in Ferguson, several hundred people marched in south St. Louis Saturday to remember VonDerrit Myers Jr.

Michael Brown, Sr., (second from the right) stands in front of the temporary memorial dedicated to his son Michael Brown, Jr. earlier this year. Brown's death had a monumental impact on the city of Ferguson -- and the St. Louis region.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

On a cloudless July morning, there’s a tranquil aura around the Corner Coffee House as the clock ticks closer to the Aug. 9 anniversary of Michael Brown’s death. Daily protests have petered out and the hordes of reporters who camped out here have moved onto the next story – at least until this weekend.

But for Ferguson residents like John Powell, there is no new normal. There’s no Aug. 8. The Catholic school teacher who’s lived in Ferguson for nine years says the town he once knew will never be the same. 

St. Louis County Prosecutor Bob McCulloch
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

With the clock ticking closer to the anniversary of Michael Brown’s shooting death, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies welcome St. Louis County Prosecutor Bob McCulloch for a special edition of Politically Speaking.

A young man carries a child past boarded up businesses along West Florissant Avenue in Ferguson.
Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

There are still scars in Ferguson.

One year after the protests that attracted the world’s attention, many of the damaged stores along West Florissant Road are still boarded up; trust between residents and police has frayed throughout the city; and private relationships have been strained by differences of opinion.

From left to right: Jerry Benner, Greg Gibson and Amy Peach.
Sarah Kellogg | St. Louis Public Radio

Part 3 of 5

The police shooting death of Michael Brown on Aug. 9, 2014 brought the eyes of the world to St. Louis. But it’s the people who live in St. Louis who were impacted most directly.

Now that a year has passed, St. Louis Public Radio is inviting you to share how Brown’s death affected your life, as well as your thoughts about how the events that followed impacted the region as a whole. We’ll be asking you a different question every day this week.

Today’s question: Are the racial divides in St. Louis better or worse than they were before Aug. 9, 2014?

Clockwise from upper left: Jerry Benner, Katie Banister, Dan Hyatt and Janice Thomas.
Sarah Kellogg | St. Louis Public Radio

Part 2 of 5

The police shooting death of Michael Brown on Aug. 9, 2014, brought the eyes of the world to St. Louis. But it’s the people who live in St. Louis who were impacted most directly.

Now that a year has passed, St. Louis Public Radio is inviting you to share how Brown’s death affected your life, as well as your thoughts about how the events that followed impacted the region as a whole. We are considering a different question every day this week.

Today’s question: What still needs to happen to resolve the issues brought to light this year?

committee crowd at microphone
Joseph Leahy / St. Louis Public Radio

A coalition of activist groups is planning a series of events this week to commemorate the first anniversary of Michael Brown Jr.’s fatal police shooting on Aug. 9, 2014.

Nearly a dozen groups are participating in the so-called “United We Fight” activities that begin Friday morning and culminate with a day of civil disobedience on Monday. 

Clockwise from the upper left: Janice Thomas, George Lenard, Greg Gibson and John Powell.
Sarah Kellogg | St. Louis Public Radio

Part 1 of 5

The shooting death of Michael Brown on Aug. 9, 2014, by a police officer in Ferguson brought the eyes of the world to St. Louis. But it’s the people who live in the St. Louis area who were impacted most directly.

Now that a year has nearly passed, St. Louis Public Radio is exploring how Brown’s death affected individuals and the region as a whole. We're discussing a different question every day this week, and we invite you to join the conversation. 

Today's question: What's changed for you since the death of Michael Brown?

Rev. Steve Lawler of St. Stephen's Episcopal and Rev. F. Willis Johnson Jr. of Wellspring Church teamed up to organize a week of workshops at Wellspring ahead of the anniversary of the death of Michael Brown.
courtesy Open Road PR

Updated Mon. 8/3/15 at 11:45 a.m.

Two Ferguson churches are teaming up to create an "incubator" for racial and economic justice. St. Stephen’s Episcopal and Wellspring churches are launching the Center for Social Empowerment and Justice with a week of workshops leading up to the anniversary of the death of Michael Brown on Sunday, Aug. 9.

The center will be on the Wellspring campus and provide programming space for several nonprofits dedicated to supporting education and small businesses, including the Ferguson-Florissant school foundation, the Ferguson Youth Initiative and Incubate Ferguson, a business-minded venture started by Rev. Steve Lawler of St. Stephen's Episcopal and the Vine.

Former Sen. Maida Coleman
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

You could say Maida Coleman has come full circle.

The former state senator worked at the public service commission back in the 1980s. There, she was a clerk who certified trucks that traversed across the state.

Flash forward to Thursday, and Coleman is about to return to the agency that regulates public utilities – but on a different level. Gov. Jay Nixon tapped Coleman to serve as a PSC commissioner, effective Aug. 10. She replaces Robert Kenney, a St. Louis attorney who was nearing the end of his six-year stint on the PSC.

Susannah Lohr | St. Louis Public Radio

With more than a hundred homicides already this year, St. Louis is no stranger to gun violence. On July 14, a St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department sergeant was ambushed while working a second, security job in the early hours of the morning. The officer survived thanks to a bulletproof vest, and four suspects have been arrested in connection with the shooting.  

We independently confirmed the identity of the officer with the St. Louis Police, but have granted him anonymity out of his concern for the safety of his family in order to hear his perspective on the situation.

Former Sen. Maida Coleman
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

On this week’s episode of the Politically Speaking podcast, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies welcome former Missouri state Sen. Maida Coleman to the program.

The St. Louis Democrat was tapped last year to lead the Office of Community Engagement, an entity set up by Gov. Jay Nixon that, in his administration’s words, is aimed at “engaging communities, public and private sector leaders, clergy and citizens across the state in communication regarding critical issues affecting Missouri communities.” 

Children at the JSO Summer Learning Enrichment Program line up to play dodgeball last Tuesday. The camp takes place at Greater St. Mark Family Church's school, which had its air conditioning units stolen earlier this year.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

On a balmy Tuesday afternoon, dozens of young children could feel the competitive spirit floating through the hallways of Greater St. Mark Family Church’s school.

Youngsters enrolled in the JSO Summer Learning Enrichment Program filed into a gymnasium to play a spirited game of kickball. It’s one of numerous activities offered at the camp, which caters mainly to low-income children from north St. Louis County.

But competitiveness wasn’t the only thing wafting through the building. Walk into certain classrooms, and the sticky, sweaty aura of heat is unmistakable.

Lawmakers in Texas approved a bill providing money and setting guidelines for police body cameras.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

At first blush, Texas state Sen. Royce West didn’t seem to have the most hospitable environment to pass legislation providing body camera grants to local law enforcement agencies.

After all, the Texas legislature isn’t brimming with Democrats like West these days. And in contrast to Missouri’s divided government, GOP officials occupy every single statewide office throughout the Lone Star State.

Michael Brown, Sr., (second from the right) stands in front of the temporary memorial dedicated to his son Michael Brown, Jr. The elder Brown helped dismantle the memorial on Wednesday.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

When Michael Brown Sr., came to the spot where his son — Michael Brown Jr. — was killed, he had the marker to show where a worldwide movement began.

Carrying a hefty plaque that honors his son, the elder Michael Brown placed the soon-to-be-permanent memorial on a grassy spot that separates Canfield Road and the sidewalk. With rain dripping down the bill of his Cardinals baseball cap, he declared: “This is permanent for what happened to Mike Brown and for what happened to him at Canfield.”

Images from the "Hearts for Ferguson" project
Great Circle

After Michael Brown was shot and killed in Ferguson last summer, and unrest delayed the opening of classes in the Ferguson-Florissant schools, the district wanted to make sure students had help handling their emotions, so their learning wasn't affected.

U.S. Rep. Emanuel Cleaver
Jim Howard I St. Louis Public Radio

This week on Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies interview U.S. Rep. Emanuel Cleaver from his Washington, D.C., office.

The Democratic congressman represents portions of Kansas City as well as several rural counties in mid-Missouri. For many years, Cleaver was a pastor at the St. James United Methodist Church in Kansas City which probably explains why he’s one of Missouri politics’ most celebrated orators.

Family attorney Anthony Gray announces that the parents of Michael Brown have filed a civil lawsuit in the Aug. 9, 2014, shooting death of their son Michael. In back from left are attorney Daryl Parks, mother Lesley McSpadden and father Michael Brown Sr.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

The parents of Michael Brown filed a wrongful death suit Thursday against the city of Ferguson, former Ferguson Police Chief Thomas Jackson and former Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson, who fatally shot Brown.

Attorney Benjamin Crump pointed to a U.S. Department of Justice report that uncovered racial bias in the Ferguson Police Department.

Michael Brown's mother, Lezley McSpadden, listens on March 5, 2015, as attorney Daryl Parks announces the family's intent to sue former police officer Darren Wilson and the city of Ferguson for her son's death.
FIle photo | Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Updated as of 10:30 pm., April 22, 2015:

The family of Michael Brown will file a wrongful death lawsuit against the City of Ferguson on Thursday, according to a news  release sent Wednesday night.

Ferguson City Councilmembers Brian Fletcher, Ella Jones and Wesley Bell take their oaths of office on Tuesday.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

Right after Ella James, Wesley Bell and Brian Fletcher were sworn in as new members of the Ferguson City Council, one of the legislative body’s veteran members provided some advice — both for his new colleagues and the people of Ferguson. 

After the aftermath of Michael Brown’s death brought nationwide attention and scrutiny on the St. Louis County suburb, Councilman Dwayne James implored the new council members and the general public to be accountable. 

Ferguson Commissioners T.R. Carr and Traci Blackmon wait to start a meeting of the commission's municipal governance working group.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

When the Ferguson Commission first met last December, its members bore the brunt of pent-up anger and frustration. It was just days after a grand jury decided against indicting former Ferguson Police officer Darren Wilson for shooting Michael Brown.

At that first gathering, the 16-member commission was beset by livid audience members and skepticism about the commission’s ultimate value. But recently inside a classroom on the University of Missouri-St. Louis campus, the tensions of last year seemed far away.

Ella Jones, center, looks up at the television during last week's election in Ferguson. Jones easily won a city council race in a suburb that's been rocked by strife and discord.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

When Ella Jones walked into Drake’s Place last Tuesday night, her diverse group of supporters was ready for a celebration.

As her well-wishers munched on tiny sandwiches, the news got better. Jones trounced three other opponents to win a seat on the Ferguson City Council. It was a victory Jones chalked up to a lot of hard work – and a cogent strategy.

Wesley Bell
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

On this special edition of the Politically Speaking podcast, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies break down the results of a municipal election cycle that received national attention.

As spring flowers push their way up at the site where Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson killed 18-year-old Michael Brown in August, thoughts around the tragedy are also emerging as more pointed questions.

What institutionalized forces may have contributed to the shooting? How has it changed the St. Louis region? Will that continue? St. Louis Public would like to hear from you. (Scroll down to the end of this post to send us your questions.)

A Taser, with cartridge removed, making an electric arc between its two electrodes
jasonesbain | Wikipedia

About four months before the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, police less than 15 miles down I-70 in St. Charles shot another man named Brown. The event barely drew any attention from anyone except immediate family and friends.

The protest in Clayton Friday, March 20, 2015 had a funeral theme, complete with a white casket carried through the streets.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

More than 100 people marched through the streets of Clayton Friday in a continuation of protests begun last August after Michael Brown was killed.

Michel Martin at microphone
August Jennewein / University of Missouri–St. Louis / St. Louis Public Radio

Seven months after the shooting death of Michael Brown in Ferguson drew national attention to racial disparities, St. Louis Public Radio is hosting a second community forum, Ferguson and Beyond: Continuing the Community Conversation.

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