Midwest

Michaella Thornton and Tina Casagrand discussed "The New Territory" magazine on St. Louis on the Air.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Likely every single person in St. Louis has either heard someone refer to the Midwest as “fly-over” country — or maybe they’ve even used the term themselves. At best, the Midwest is viewed as behind-the-times. At worst, people ignore it entirely. A new Missouri-based publication, aptly-named The New Territory, is trying to change that.

(Courtesy: RAYGUN)

Encore (Original Air Date: 12/20/12)

The Midwest sometimes gets short shrift from people on both ends of the country.  They often call it “flyover country.”  In other words, they ask, “Why would anyone want to stop in the Midwest?”

Native Midwesterners or transplants might take exception to the term, “flyover country.”

One man who certainly takes exception to the term is Mike Draper.

Midwest Mayhem is more than music

May 15, 2013
DJ Needles
Jarred Gastreich | For the St. Louis Beacon

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: At the KDHX Midwest Mayhem bash last week, people and music came together at the City Museum:

(Courtesy: RAYGUN)

The Midwest sometimes gets short shrift from people on both ends of the country.  They often call it “flyover country.”  In other words, they ask, “Why would anyone want to stop in the Midwest?”

Native Midwesterners or transplants might take exception to the term, “flyover country.”

One man who certainly takes exception to the term is Mike Draper.

Tomorrow marks the St. Louis kickoff of the bicentennial events commemorating the earthquakes that struck the New Madrid Seismic Zone in 1811-12.  You’ve probably heard stories about those quakes: that church bells rang in Boston, that the Mississippi River ran backwards. Much of that, it turns out, is legend.  So what do we know about the New Madrid fault and the risk it poses to the modern Midwest?

Flickr/Rob Lee

A survey says that economic growth in the Midwest will continue into the first half of the new year, but what does that really mean?