Mike Parson | St. Louis Public Radio

Mike Parson

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Legislation is awaiting action in the Missouri Senate that would change the filing period for candidates planning to run in the state’s Democratic and Republican primaries in August.

(via Flickr/jennlynndesign)

Missouri is one of 24 states where citizens who gather enough signatures can put a question on the ballot.

They’re called voter initiatives.

While voters have the ability to enact laws in Missouri, those laws can be changed or even overturned by legislators.

This year, two voter-approved laws, one on puppy mills, the other on the minimum wage, have been targeted at the state capitol.

St. Louis Public Radio’s Maria Altman reports.

Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri Senate has passed controversial legislation that would reverse portions of Proposition B

Voters narrowly approved the ballot measure last November, which limits dog breeders to 50 dogs per operation and requires adequate food, water and outdoor access.

The Missouri Senate has given first-round approval to a bill that would reverse portions of Proposition B, a ballot measure narrowly approved by voters last year to regulate dog breeders.

The bill would do away with Proposition B’s limit of 50 dogs per breeder, and changes the name of the law from “Puppy Mill Cruelty Prevention Act” to “Canine Cruelty Prevention Act.”