Mississippi River Bridge

(david_shane)

Mo. Senator accuses state labor department of improperly manipulating wages with unions

A top Missouri Senate leader says the state labor department is improperly working with unions to manipulate wages paid on public works projects. The state calculates an annual "prevailing wage" for various construction trades in each county based on surveys of wages already paid on jobs.

Senate President Pro Tem Rob Mayer, a Republican from Dexter, said Wednesday that state bureaucrats and labor unions had engaged in what he called "collusion.

(Missouri Department of Transportation website)

Updated at 10:05 p.m.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch, quoting East St. Louis Police chief Michael Floore, says the missing worker has tentatively been identified as 35-year-old Andy Gammon of Park Hills, Mo., which is about 65 miles south of St. Louis. The Post-Dispatch says investigators from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration are on scene to investigate.

(via Missouri Department of Transportation)

The new Mississippi Bridge Project  is facing a new obstacle. The Metro East Black Contractors Organization is suing to stop the Illinois Department of Transportation from handing out more contracts on the $760 million project until discrimination issues are addressed.

The organization says they aren't getting their fair share of work on the project. The group's attorney Eric Vickers says in addition to an injunction on awarding more contracts, the new lawsuit calls for IDOT to pay $650 million in damages.

(via Flickr/ConspiracyofHappiness)

Cardinals lose Game 1 of NLCS

View I-70 Downtown Closure - Oct. 6-12 2011 in a larger map

A map of the closure area can be seen above.

Heading to the Roger Daltry concert at the Peabody or the Blues' opening game this weekend? Or were you thinking of cruising around downtown for any other reason from Oct. 6-12? Well, if your travel plans include using Interstate 70 between 10th St. and the Poplar Street Bridge, we offer the friendly suggestion to find an alternate route.

(Courtesy of MoDOT)

The Missouri Department of Transportation and its contractor Millstone Bangert Inc. will permanently close the exit ramp 249A from eastbound Interstate 70 to 10th Street in St. Louis City at  9  a.m. October 10, 2011.

The ramp will be removed permanently so crews can construct roadway and ramps between I-70 and the new Mississippi River Bridge. The new ramps to the bridge will cross directly over the current location of the 10th Street exit ramps.

Drivers can use Broadway exit 250A to get into the city.

Photo courtesy of MoDOT

Workers threaten to shut down construction on Mississippi River bridge

A group that's trying to get more construction jobs for minority workers says it'll shut down work on a new Mississippi River bridge near St. Louis. The Metro East Black Contractors Organization says it's meeting with the director of the Illinois Department of Transportation on Friday. The group says it'll shut down work on Monday if the meeting isn't satisfactory.

St. Louis Science Center to reduce number of VPs

(photo courtesy of MoDOT)

The moderate flooding along the Mississippi River at St. Louis is costing crews building the piers for the new bridge a couple of days of work a week.

MoDOT project manager Greg Horn said workers are still out on the piers six days a week, 20 hours a day. But the flooding - the river is about five feet above flood stage - means crews can only work at about 60 percent efficiency.

Officials with the Missouri Department of Transportation say work on the Poplar Street Bridge will start this spring and continue into the fall.

The work will involve resurfacing the bridge deck and will result in lane closures and traffic delays.

Deanna Venker is an area engineer for MoDOT.  She says the work could not be delayed until the completion of the new Mississippi River bridge in 2014.

(Rachel Lippmann, St. Louis Public Radio)

Crews working on the new Mississippi River Bridge have gotten the $640 million project back on track.

Flooding meant that for the months of May, June, and July, it wasn't safe for crews to be working below the water line, says project manager Greg Horn. That wiped out 81 construction days.

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