Mississippi River

Mississippi River
11:03 am
Fri December 7, 2012

Corps Of Engineers Decides Against Releasing More Water For Mississippi

(via Flickr/The Confluence)

A top Army Corps of Engineers official says she believes the low Mississippi River will remain open to shipping, partly justifying the agency's decision to not release more water from the Missouri River into the Mississippi.

Army Assistant Secretary Jo-Ellen Darcy, in a Thursday letter obtained by The Associated Press, tells lawmakers from Mississippi River states that the agency won't be scaling back the amount of Missouri River water it began withholding last month from the Mississippi.

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Business
6:06 pm
Thu December 6, 2012

Upstream States Lay Claim To Water Bound For Mississippi

Credit Kelly Martin / Via Wikimedia Commons

Lawmakers in states up upstream on the Missouri River are bracing for a fight if any action is taken to reopen dams on the Missouri River.

Northern states say their need for water is just as important as moving barges on the Mississippi River.

So far the President is staying out of the water war between states in the Mississippi River watershed, which includes the Missouri River.

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Shipping
2:57 pm
Tue December 4, 2012

Water Fight: Drought, Farming, Fracking And The Midwest's Tense Shipping Situation

Barge workers on the Mississippi River near St. Louis on Dec. 2, 2012. Low river levels have caused significant issues for the shipping industry on the river.
(via Flickr/pasa47)

Politicians across the Midwest are continuing to press the President to declare a state of emergency on the Mississippi River to allow barge traffic to keep flowing.

Every year roughly $180 billion worth of freight makes its way up and down the river.

Now, a record shortage of water on the nation’s major inland waterways is expected to put upward pressure on everything from food items to electricity.

The drought effect

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Business
5:24 pm
Fri November 16, 2012

Army Corps Moving Forward With Plans To Reduce Flow On Missouri River

Low water on Mississippi River could get lower
Credit Adam Allington / St. Louis Public Radio

Businesses that work and ship on the Mississippi River are seeking a presidential declaration keep water flowing out of reservoirs on the Missouri River.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers closes dams in South Dakota at this time every year to store water to maintain levels later in the spring and summer.

The Missouri River accounts for roughly 60 percent of the water flowing by St. Louis. In a drought-year like this year, George Foster of St. Louis’ J.B. Marine says reducing river levels would risk closing the shipping channel.

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Barge Shipping
12:17 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

Nixon: Keep Water On Rivers Flowing, Economy With It

A barge on the Mississippi River.
(via Flickr/The Confluence)

Updated 12:29 p.m.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon and the barge industry are imploring the federal government to keep water flowing on the Missouri and Mississippi rivers or face potential "economic disaster."

The drought has left many waterways at historic lows. Nixon sent a letter Friday urging the Army Corps of Engineers to rethink plans to reduce the amount of water released from the Missouri's upstream reservoir. That would also reduce flow on the Mississippi below St. Louis.

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Mississippi River
3:50 pm
Tue September 25, 2012

Lawmakers: Mississippi River Locks 'Desperate' For Repair

A barge travels the Mississippi River.
(via Flickr/The Confluence)

Federal lawmakers from several states along the Mississippi River are pressing to modernize the waterway's locks-and-dams system, which they say desperately needs repair.

Sens. Dick Durbin and Mark Kirk of Illinois, Claire McCaskill and Roy Blunt from Missouri, and Tom Harkin and Chuck Grassley from Iowa are pressing the Environmental and Public Works Committee to ensure funding to hasten what they term critical improvements.

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Mississippi River
2:57 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

New initiative aims to bring greater attention to Mississippi River issues

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay speaks during the kick off event for the Mississippi River Cities and Towns Initiative
Tim Lloyd St. Louis Public Radio

Mayors from 19 cities and towns are in St. Louis this week to launch a new initiative aimed at bringing greater attention to issues affecting the Mississippi River.

A total of 41 mayors, so far, have formally agreed to the partnership, which is set to begin lobbying congress in March of next year.

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay said mutual interests trump party politics.

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Morning round-up
9:34 am
Thu September 13, 2012

Morning headlines: Thursday, September 13, 2012

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

New report: "vast improvements" at John Cochran VA Medical Center

A new government report says the John Cochran VA Medical Center in St. Louis has made "vast improvements" after an earlier report noted problems.

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Drought/Rivers
11:36 am
Fri August 17, 2012

Army Corps says low river levels not going away any time soon

The Missouri River, south of Rocheport, Mo.

Officials with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers were in Alton Friday as part of their annual low-water inspection.

The Corps has stepped up emergency scouring and dredging operations in response to the unprecedented low water levels in the Mississippi River Basin.

Marty Hettle works for the barge operator, AEP.  He says the river forecast is not expected to trend upward any time soon.

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Drought/river traffic
6:26 pm
Wed August 1, 2012

Nixon says state observing river levels for shipping

Barges pass under the Poplar Street Bridge. (via Wikimedia Commons/ Bachrach44)

Governor Jay Nixon (D) says his administration is keeping tabs on river levels along the Missouri and Mississippi as drought conditions persist across the state.  He indicates that the Missouri River may be in worse shape.

“I think that the challenges on the Missouri are a little more significant than the Mississippi," Nixon said at a gathering Wednesday in Jefferson City.  "Minnesota has had a fair amount of rain in that part of the country, but we’re watching those issues very carefully.”

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