Missouri Botanical Garden

(via Flickr/Missouri Botanical Garden)

Campaigns to protect our environment and improve sustainability efforts are numerous and ongoing in the St. Louis area.  Host Don Marsh talks with environmental experts about what has been done, what is being done, and what still needs to be done to further protect our planet. 

(Julie Bierach/St. Louis Public Radio)

Most of us haven’t scaled a tree since we were kids.

But it’s not too late!

On several weekends this fall the Missouri Botanical Garden is giving both adults and kids the chance, with the help of a professional.

St. Louis Public Radio’s Maria Altman got a birds-eye view of the Garden’s tree canopy climb.

Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

A second Amorphophallus titanum has bloomed at the Missouri Botanical Garden. It’s known as the titan arum – the flower can reach over six feet tall – or the “corpse flower” for its strong smell of rotting meat. The odor attracts flies, which help pollinate the plant.

The corpse flower can go for years without blooming. When it does, the flower lasts just a few days. Fewer than 160 are known to have bloomed worldwide, in the almost 120 years since the plant was identified by scientists in Sumatra.

Ed Spevak / Saint Louis Zoo

The Missouri Department of Agriculture is launching a new initiative to try to create some buzz about bees.

Agriculture Director Jon Hagler says “The Great Missouri Buzz Off” aims to educate Missourians about bees and beekeeping.

“Whether it be honeybees, or native bees, they’re so vital to our agriculture’s success, and to our horticulture’s success, and we have such amazing resources here in our state,” Hagler said.

(Missouri Botanical Garden)

The Missouri Botanical Garden has announced plans to help build an online database of the world’s plants.

Working with the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, and the New York Botanical Garden, the Missouri Botanical Garden will compile information on as many as 400,000 land plant species, with the goal of having all the data available online by 2020.

(Frank Mbago/Missouri Botanical Garden)

Scientists at the Missouri Botanical Garden have confirmed the discovery of two tree species that were thought to be extinct.

Last year botanists from the University of Dar es Salaam in Tanzania set out to look for the trees. They discovered small populations of both species in a remote forest in southeastern Tanzania, along Africa’s eastern coast.

Missouri Botanical Garden botanist Roy Gereau worked with British scientist Phil Clarke to confirm the identity of the trees.

(Asha Paudel)

The Himalayan mountain range in Asia is one of the highest places in the world, with several peaks rising above 8,000 meters. It’s also one of the most vulnerable to climate change.

Seven years ago, Missouri Botanical Garden senior curator of ethnobotany Jan Salick traveled to the Himalayas to begin a study of how climate change is affecting alpine plants—and the local people who depend on them.

St. Louis Public Radio's Véronique LaCapra sat down with Salick to talk about her research.

A series of performances at Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts will blur the lines separating art, theater and social work to break down barriers among people and communities.

Courtesy of the Pulitzer

 

Emily Piro, case manager at St. Patrick Center, works with "Staging Reflections of the Buddha."

A series of performances at Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts will blur the lines separating art, theater and social work to break down barriers among people and communities.

Courtesy of the Pulitzer

 

Emily Piro, case manager at St. Patrick Center, works with "Staging Reflections of the Buddha."

The sweetest art exhibition of the year is coming to the Missouri Botanical Garden this weekend. 

Cakes and cookies made by members of the St. Louis Metropolitan Sugar Art Guild will be on display at the Garden on Sunday in “Sugared, Spiced and Everything Iced.” The exhibition is a feast for the eyes but eating the featured creations is not allowed. The event will include decorating demonstrations and the opportunity to ask the baker-designers about their craft. 

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