Missouri Chamber of Commerce

Supporters of raising St. Louis' minimum wage listen to testimony Tuesday at St. Louis City Hall.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

A decade after their last successful effort, Missouri backers of a higher minimum wage believe that 2016 may finally be their year for a successful replay.

“The ground is shifting really quickly in this country around the minimum wage,’’ said Lara Granich, Missouri director for the St. Louis-based group called Jobs With Justice. “The momentum is really growing, month by month.”

St. Louis Public Radio reporters Chris McDaniel, Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies welcomed Dan Mehan, president of the Missouri Chamber of Commerce and Industry, to the Politically Speaking podcast.

Erin Williams / St. Louis Public Radio

President Barack Obama sent a message during his State of the Union address to every mayor, governor and state legislator who want to increase the minimum wage: Don't wait on Congress, Americans will support more local government initiatives.

(Via Flickr/Rosemary)

The Missouri Chamber of Commerce is lauding a new proposal to expand Medicaid. The business group says it would allow Missouri to take advantage of the $2 billion a year in federal subsidies that it currently has declined to accept.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

A study released Thursday by the Missouri Chamber of Commerce and Industry states that Missouri is "falling behind" when it comes to providing digital learning for K-12 students. 

The chamber commissioned the study, which was conducted by the Colorado-based Evergreen Education Group.  Chamber President and CEO Dan Mehan says although online learning options are available in the Show-Me State, most require tuition, while those that don’t are limited geographically.

File photo

Retired U.S. Sen. Christopher “Kit” Bond, R-Mo., is jumping into the Jefferson City debate over Medicaid expansion – and he’s on the side of  Gov. Jay Nixon and other expansion supporters.

Bond, a former two-term governor, has been hired as a lobbyist by the Missouri Chamber to try to persuade fellow Republicans in the General Assembly to drop their opposition and agree to take the federal aid which would cover all the expansion’s costs for three years and at least 90 percent thereafter.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The first full week of the Missouri’s General Assembly is officially underway, and already the focus has shifted away from the expected topics – tax cuts and Medicaid expansion – and landed smack dab in the midst of a potentially bruising battle over labor rights.

The fight offers the potential of overshadowing other legislative issues for weeks, if not months.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Governor Jay Nixon is taking action against a radio ad in which Texas Governor Rick Perry encourages Missouri businesses to leave for his state.

Nixon’s campaign committee is running an ad that defends Missouri as a better place to do business than Texas on St. Louis radio station KTRS. The station previously refused to run Perry's ad. 

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

While Governor Jay Nixon (D) continues touring Missouri to oppose efforts to override his veto of tax cut legislation, a group of business officials and political activists are trying to rally support for the override effort.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

A Missouri House committee looking at ways to downsize state government wrapped up its three-day tour across the state with three meetings Thursday, in St. Joseph, Columbia, and at the State Capitol in Jefferson City.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Testimony was heard today on legislation that would redefine what constitutes workplace discrimination in Missouri.

If passed, workplace discrimination would have to be a motivating factor, not just a contributing one, in any wrongful action taken against a worker by an employer, which is the current federal standard.  Attorney Rich AuBuchon spoke in favor of the bill on behalf of his former employer, the Missouri Chamber of Commerce.  He told the House Committee on Workforce Development and Workplace Safety that the state’s current definition of discrimination is hurting Missouri’s economy.

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Unofficial recount results confirms Koenen victory

A recount has confirmed that Glenn Koenen won a Democratic primary for a suburban St. Louis congressional seat and will face Republican Ann Wagner in the November election.

Unofficial results of the recount released Thursday by the secretary of state's office show Koenen's margin of victory declined by two votes compared to the original count from the August 7th primary. But he still finished 46 votes ahead of Harold Whitfield in a four-person primary that drew a total of nearly 28,000 votes.

The head of the Missouri Department of Transportation says charging tolls on Interstate 70 is the only real option for funding reconstruction of the highway, if the state wants to do something about it right now.

MoDOT Director Kevin Keith told a gathering of the Missouri Chamber of Commerce and Industry Thursday that converting I-70 to a toll road could have short-term benefits, namely, job creation.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Mo. businesses team up with labor unions to tout tax incentive package

The AFL-CIO has joined with the Missouri Chamber of Commerce and Industry and several local chamber affiliates to push for passage of wide-ranging legislation during a special session set to begin Sept. 6.

(UPI/Tom Uhlenbrock)

A former Republican Senator from Missouri is leading a new non-profit organization that will offer business loans to businesses who want to build or expand in Joplin.

  • St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay calls a new report documenting a plummeting population "absolutely bad news." News U.S. Census figures released Thursday show that the Gateway City lost nearly 29,000 people over the past decade, a decline of about 8 percent of its population. The reports said the city had a population of a little more than 319,000 in 2010.