Missouri Coalition for the Environment

A dead zone with sediment from the Mississippi River carries fertilizer to the Gulf of Mexico.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

This story was updated to clarify how the EPA would proceed. The Environmental Protection Agency will propose regulations on nutrient pollution by mid-December 2017 to settle a lawsuit filed by an environmental group in U.S. District Court. The Missouri Coalition for the Environment filed a lawsuit against the EPA in February for not adequately addressing the issue of nutrient pollution through the Clean Water Act. The EPA has agreed to propose rules by next year, unless the agency approves criteria submitted by the state before the deadline. Nitrogen, phosphorus and other nutrients enter waterways through fertilizer runoff and sewage treatment plant discharges. An overabundance of such nutrients have caused fish kills, harmful algal blooms and dead zones along the Mississippi River.

A dead zone with sediment from the Mississippi River carries fertilizer to the Gulf of Mexico.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Environmental advocates are calling on the Environmental Protection Agency to manage nutrient pollution from states that border the Mississippi River. The Mississippi River Collaborative, a group of environmental policy experts, recently released a new report that describes how the 10 states along the river are not making progress in reducing the amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus that eventually make its way down to the Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone.

Niang washes some freshly picked produce before selling it to Saint Louis University.
Kim Oswalt | St. Louis Public Radio

A coalition of food access organizations is surveying city residents to better understand how to encourage more urban agriculture in St. Louis. The effort could lead to an ordinance that will remove some barriers people experience in growing their own food in the city.

(courtesy Ameren)

The Missouri Coalition for the Environment filed a federal lawsuit Thursday over a federal agency’s renewal for Ameren’s Callaway Nuclear Power Plant. In March, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission renewed Ameren’s operating license for the plant through 2044. The previous license does not expire until 2024. The Coalition for the Environment is already a part of another federal suit filed last fall against the NRC. It claims the agency’s rules regarding long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel...

An MSD crew worked on a sanitation line in Webster Woods in 2015.
Metropolitan St. Lewis Sewer District

Updated 3/19/15 to correct the bond amount being requested and add a link to the full rate change proposal. The Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District has proposed two major changes to the rates consumers pay for services and is holding a series of community meetings to explain them. But even without the new proposals, everyone can expect to see their residential sewer rates continue to rise. According to MSD spokesperson Lance LeComb, rates have gone from an average of about $13 per month for...

Ameren's Callaway reactor is the only commercial nuclear power plant in Missouri.
Missouri Coalition for the Environment

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has renewed the operating license for Ameren's Callaway nuclear power plant through 2044. But ongoing litigation could quash that renewal.

Ameren Missouri's coal fire power plant at Labadie.
Veronique LaCapra I St. Louis Public Radio

Ameren is asking for more time and pitching an alternative plan to the Environmental Protection Agency's proposal to cut power plant carbon emissions by 30 percent by 2030. The EPA's Clean Power Plan would require states to meet incremental goals starting in 2020, to measure progress toward the final target reduction. But in a white paper released Wednesday, Ameren said by expecting states "to comply with such stringent targets on such short notice," that plan would impose "staggering costs"...

via Flickr / Mark Hadley

Farms surrounding St. Louis now dedicate much less land to growing fruits and vegetables than they did 80 years ago. According to a report released Wednesday by the Missouri Coalition for the Environment, only one tenth of 1 percent of the cropland surrounding St. Louis is dedicated to produce. Commodity crops such as corn and soybeans take up the vast majority of the agricultural land within a 100-mile radius of the city. The environmental advocacy group compiled data from 1925 to 2007 from...

Maria Altman|St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri Coalition for the Environment and several solar panel companies have filed a lawsuit against the Missouri Public Service Commission in an effort to keep the state’s solar rebate program alive. A voter-passed referendum from 2008 requires investor-owned utilities to pay rebates of $2 per watt to customers who get solar panels. (Read an earlier report on the rebate here .) The lawsuit, filed Monday in Cole County, seeks to prevent the commission from ending the program, as...

RiverCity Images

Updated 2/7/14 to correct the timeline of the lawsuit against MSD. The Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District is preparing for its first big dig. Starting in a few days, MSD will begin construction of a 3,028 foot-long tunnel under the River Des Peres, just south of Carondelet. The tunnel will hold a pressurized pipe that will carry sewage to the Lemay Wastewater Treatment Plant. MSD spokesperson Lance LeComb said the new pipe will increase the plant’s capacity to take in sewage, and also...

(Sarah Skiold-Hanlin, St. Louis Public Radio)

A nuclear policy analyst is adding his voice to those of area residents, environmental advocates and local government officials who want radioactive wastes out of the West Lake Landfill in Bridgeton . Robert Alvarez served as a senior policy advisor in the Department of Energy under the Clinton administration and is currently a senior scholar at the Institute for Policy Studies. Drawing on data from existing studies, Alvarez has written a report assessing the West Lake Landfill for the...

(Véronique LaCapra/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated 4:07 p.m. Preliminary work to build a firebreak at the Bridgeton Landfill will begin next week. But a local environmental group is worried about what it could stir up. To figure out where they can safely dig the trench that will separate the underground fire from the radioactive waste, contractors will test the soil for radioactivity. That involves clearing trees and shrubs away from where the firebreak will be built. The Missouri Coalition for the Environment's Ed Smith says if...

Enbridge Energy Company, Inc.

Updated at 5:00 p.m. A St. Louis-based environmental group has filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for failing to provide information about a multi-state oil pipeline project. The Missouri Coalition for the Environment says the Corps unlawfully withheld documents requested under the Freedom of Information Act. The group is trying to find out more about plans by the Canadian energy company Enbridge to build a 600-mile pipeline that would carry oil through parts of Illinois...

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Regional officials with the federal Environmental Protection Agency are holding a public meeting Tues., June 25 to allay fears of Bridgeton area residents about the possible health risks posed by the radioactive waste stored at the West Lake Landfill. The meeting is to be held at Pattonville High School, from 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Updated 2:15 p.m. with link to full legal document. A St. Louis-based environmental group is asking the federal government to more closely scrutinize Ameren Corp.s request for a 20-year license renewal at Missouris only nuclear power plant. The Missouri Coalition for the Environment has filed a legal objection to the utilitys plan with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Amerens current 40-year operating license for the Callaway County plant expires in 2024. Coalition attorney Diane...

(via Ted Heisel/Missouri Coalition for the Environment)

A consent decree that will settle a four-year-old lawsuit against the Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District over violations of the Clean Water Ac t is a step closer to taking effect. MSD, the federal Environmental Protection Agency, and the advocacy group Missouri Coalition for the Environment submitted the settlement to the U.S. District Court in St. Louis today. It will remain open for public comment for 30 days before taking final effect. The lawsuit, filed in June 2007, alleged that MSD...

(Ted Heisel/Missouri Coalition for the Environment)

The board of the Metropolitan Sewer District has approved a settlement with the federal government and a local environmental action group over violations of the Clean Water Act. The state of Missouri was also a party to the 2007 lawsuit, but did not approve the settlement. The agreement will, among other things, require MSD to: Make $4.7 billion in improvements over the next 23 years, including eliminating about 200 sanity sewer bypasses that dump raw sewage into local streams; Pay a $1.2...

(via Flickr/Paul Sableman)

The Board of Trustees for the Metropolitan Sewer District gave its initial approval last night to a multi-billion dollar plan to settle a Clean War Act lawsuit. The state of Missouri and the EPA filed the suit in 2007, which the Missouri Coalition for the Environment later joined. It alleged, among other things that On at least 7,000 occasions between at least 2001 and 2005, and upon information and belief continuing to the present, MSD has discharged pollutants containing raw sewage ... into...

Updated 3:30 p.m. June 3 to include comment from MSD. Updated at 9:55 a.m. June 3 to reflect that the State of Missouri has not signed on to the consent decree. A lawsuit brought by the Environmental Protection Agency against the Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District back in June 2007 could soon be resolved. The EPA and later the Missouri Coalition for the Environment alleged MSD had violated the Clean Water Act by discharging raw sewage into some rivers and streams through combined sewer...