Missouri Department of Conservation

Missouri State Parks
4:16 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Missouri Environmental Agency Says $400 Million Needed For State Parks

Stuart Keating of Environment Missouri speaks at a press conference at the Coronado Ballroom in St. Louis.
Kristin McGuire/Environment Missouri

Environment Missouri, a state environmental advocacy group, kicked off its campaign today by calling on state legislators to take action on what they say are $400 million worth of back-logged repairs to state parks.

The organization says that state parks are crucial to the economy, bringing an average of 18 million visitors a year, and providing over 14,000 jobs.

Parks are currently funded by (bear with me) half of a one-tenth-of-one-cent sales tax, a tax voters have continued to renew over the years. But Environment Missouri thinks that it’s not enough.

Read more
Wildlife
10:47 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Why Are Thousands Of Snow Geese In St. Charles And Lincoln Counties This Year?

Snow geese come in two colors or "morphs:" white and "blue."
Credit Missouri Department of Conservation

If you live or spend time in St. Charles or Lincoln Counties, you’ve probably noticed an unusual number of snow geese around. The birds have been congregating near the confluence of the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers — estimates of their numbers run as high as 20,000.

Read more
Bobwhite Quail
6:41 am
Sat October 27, 2012

Bobwhite Quail Makes Comeback In Mo., Thanks To Hot Dry Summer

Mo. Dept. of Conservation

This summer’s devastating drought and heat wave actually benefited some of Missouri’s native birds, in particular the bobwhite quail.


Bobwhite quail build their nests on the ground, and the hot and dry weather from both this summer and last provided better conditions for incubation.  Max Alleger is a wildlife ecologist with the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC).  He says the bobwhite quail population took a big hit in 2008 due to record-setting rainfall, as it was hard for them to keep their eggs warm on wet ground.

Read more
Fall foliage
4:32 pm
Fri September 28, 2012

Recent Rainfall May Salvage Missouri's 2012 Fall Foliage

Several trees near the Mo. Capitol have already begun turning...this photo was taken on Sept. 28th, 2012.
Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri’s fall foliage may not be a bust this year, after all.


Jim Low  with the Missouri Department of Conservation says things looked pretty grim until a cold front this week dumped several inches of rain in portions of Missouri.


“Trees were very stressed because of the lack of moisture," Low said.  "The photosynthesis going on in those leaves was minimal."

Read more
Elk deaths
11:04 am
Fri August 3, 2012

Heat, stress of move likely led to deaths of reintroduced elk

Some of the elk before their reintroduction in 2011.

Kurt Schilligo contributed reporting for this story.

The record summer heat has probably contributed to the death of some of the elk herd recently reintroduced in the Missouri Ozarks.

The Missouri Department of Conservation says six female adults and four calves died in mid-to-late July. The mothers of two of the calves were among the dead females.

Read more
Emerald ash borer
6:22 am
Tue May 29, 2012

Mo. campers urged to use local firewood

The Mo. Dept. of Conservation is urging the use of local firewood to stop the spread of the emerald ash borer, pictured here.
(via Flickr/US Department of Agriculture)

Jacob McCleland contributed reporting for this story.

With the unofficial start of the summer season behind us, the Missouri Department of Conservation is urging campers not to transport firewood - in an effort to stop the spread of the emerald ash borer.

"Don't move firewood," said MDC forest entomologist Rob Lawrence. "It's not only the emerald ash borer that we're concerned about, and it's not just ash wood. There are a lot of pests that are not native to North America that have gotten carried in here, and they hitchhike on firewood."

Read more
Elk restoration audit
5:15 pm
Wed December 28, 2011

Elk restoration plan comes under fire from state auditor

State auditor Tom Schweich has faulted the budgeting of a Mo. Dept. of Conservation project to restore elk in the state.
(Missouri Dept. of Conservation)

A controversial Missouri Department of Conservation plan to reintroduce elk into southeastern Missouri is under fire from Republican state auditor Tom Schweich.

Read more
Conservation - Endangered Species
11:25 am
Wed November 30, 2011

Breeding program at St. Louis Zoo gives hope for giant Ozark salamander

For the first time ever, an endangered amphibian found only in a few Missouri and Arkansas counties has been successfully bred in captivity.

Officials with the St. Louis Zoo and Missouri Department of Conservation said Wednesday that 63 Ozark hellbenders have been bred at the zoo. The first hatched on Nov. 15, and an additional 120 eggs are expected to hatch within the next week.

The breeding is the result of a decade-long collaboration of the zoo and the conservation department. 

Read more
Deer hunting
3:18 pm
Tue November 29, 2011

Unusual antlered does reported to MDC by Mo. deer hunters

Deer hunters display their unusual find - a female deer with developed antlers.
(via Missouri Department of Conservation/Amy Nold)

Some Missouri deer hunters made unexpected discoveries while hunting this fall. Five female deer have been reported by hunters to the Missouri Department of Conservation sporting fully formed antlers. The antlered deer, analyzed by MDC Resource Scientist Emily Flinn, appear to be externally female. Flinn specializes in deer biology and says this phenomenon all comes down to hormones.

Read more
Elk restoration
4:18 pm
Thu June 2, 2011

Elk released from holding pen, some with new calves

The elk brought to Missouri early last month as part of a restoration project have been released from their holding pen.

The Missouri Department of Conservation released the 34 elk along with five newborn calves on Wednesday.

The adult elk and calves have been fitted with GPS radio collars as part of a cooperative research project with the University of Missouri-Columbia. The collars will help researchers track the elk's health, movement patterns and preferred types of vegetation.

Pages