Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services

The same day a federal appeals court overruled itself and voted to block two Missouri abortion restrictions, the state advised Missouri abortion providers that they will have to abide by a new restriction.

A memo dated Oct. 2 from the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) says the agency will file emergency rules on Oct. 24 establishing standards for “complication plans” for medication-induced abortions.

Lone Star ticks are one of the most common ticks in Missouri. It carries ehrlichiosis, which causes flu-like symptoms, among other diseases.
Provided |U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Amid an increase in tick-borne illnesses this year, Missouri health officials have launched a study to trap and test ticks for diseases. 

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services is working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to study ticks at Meramec State Park. The research, which began in June, aims to understand how ticks spread rare diseases, such as the Bourbon and Heartland viruses. Last month, a Missouri resident tested positive for the Bourbon virus.

Sherry Payne

A Missouri registered nurse who had to abandon plans to walk across the state to raise awareness of black infant mortality rates made her final stop in St. Louis Friday.

Sherry Payne, who is the director of the perinatal health organization Uzazi Village based in Kansas City, gave a presentation at St. Louis University on ways to improve birth outcomes for black babies.

Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster announced a preliminary agreement on Tuesday with the owner of the Bridgeton Landfill.

Koster filed a lawsuit against Republic Services six weeks ago, alleging violations of state environmental laws. A fire has been smoldering underground at the landfill for two and half years.

Commentary: State Department of Health cancer study surveyed the wrong people

Mar 26, 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The Missouri Department of Health’s new report failing to link piles of uranium, thorium and radium to cancers in current residents of North St. Louis County is just like the old joke about a man who is searching for his car keys under a streetlight. When a passerby asks him where he had last seen the keys, he points toward a dark alley nearby.

"Then why aren't you looking over there?" asks the bystander.

The man looks up and replies, "Because the light is better over here."

The Department of Health looked where the light was shining, not where we think the keys were lost.

(via Flickr/rosmary)

A Missouri health official says the state could need as many as 130 temporary workers to evaluate the needs of thousands of Medicaid patients after an outside contractor quit.

Indiana-based SynCare LLC quit after three months amid complaints about its service and disagreement with Missouri officials.

(via Flickr/rosmary)

Updated 4:25 p.m. with comments from Mo. House Budget Chairman Ryan Silvey (R, Kansas City), who also oversees an interim committee looking into complaints against SynCare.

The State of Missouri is taking over the duties of SynCare, an Indianapolis-based company which won a contract in February worth as much as $5.5 million a year to determine whether thousands of Missouri Medicaid recipients qualify for home-based medical services or help with daily chores. 

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: July 28, 2008 - Let's say you're a recent transplant from Minnesota, now living in St. Louis, and as luck would have it, you're facing surgery with a hospital stay.

You've heard the hospitals in St. Louis are good -- some said to be among the nation's best -- but maybe you want to do some comparison shopping. In Minnesota, when your mother needed surgery, you went online to the state's health department website.