Missouri Department of Revenue | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Department of Revenue

File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

A bill moving through the Missouri General Assembly calls for mapping the state's more than 2,200 special tax districts. 

The number of such districts has exploded over the last 10 years, according to the bill's sponsor, state Rep. Phil Christofanelli, R-St. Peters. He said in some areas the layering of districts has pushed sales tax rates up in "a considerable way."

State Auditor Nicole Galloway and Gov. Eric Greitens listen during a ceremony revealing Gov. Jay Nixon's gubernatorial portriat on Jan. 4, 2018.
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

A state audit contends that a cash shortfall is primarily to blame for Missouri residents receiving their state income tax refunds late this past year.

Open Grid Scheduler / Grid Engine | Flickr

Airbnb, the popular home-sharing and rental website, announced Wednesday it will begin collecting Missouri’s 4.2 percent state sales tax for its hosts. 

The company reached an agreement with the Missouri Department of Revenue to allow Airbnb to collect and remit the state sales tax for the company’s bookings, starting Feb. 1.

Illustration by Rici Hoffarth | St. Louis Public Radio

A gubernatorial commission wants to substantially scale back some of Missouri’s largest tax credit programs, which could set up a contentious fight during next year’s legislative session.

Nicole Galloway takes the oath of office as Missouri auditor from Supreme Court Chief Justice Mary Russell.
File photo | Tim Bommel | Missouri House Communications

Updated 4:45 p.m. April 20 with Galloway news release — Missouri State Auditor Nicole Galloway issued a subpoena to the Department of Revenue on Wednesday with the aim of forcing the agency to turn over information on how it manages income tax refunds.

Galloway requested the information six weeks ago for an ongoing audit and said she hadn’t received anything.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Governor Jay Nixon (D) has issued an executive order directing the Missouri Department of Revenue (DOR) to accept jointly filed state income tax returns from same-sex married couples living in the Show-Me State.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

A Missouri House committee that spent the summer investigating the Department of Revenue (DOR) is officially accusing the state agency of breaking the law.

Gov. Jay Nixon’s administration showed an “indifference” to Missourians’ privacy rights, according to a report from a House committee examining the controversy over the Department of Revenue’s handling of personal documents, including conceal-carry permits.

State Auditor's office

An audit released Monday finds that the Missouri Department of Revenue (DOR) broke state law with its now-defunct policy of scanning documents of driver's license and conceal-carry applicants.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

A special Missouri House committee appointed to look into why the Department of Revenue began scanning documents of driver's license and conceal-carry applicants has wrapped up its series of hearings this summer.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The final day of hearings into the Department of Revenue's now-defunct policy of scanning and storing documents of driver's license applicants featured the agency's former director answering questions under oath.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

A Missouri House committee looking into the Department of Revenue's now-defunct policy of scanning documents of driver's license applicants is finally hearing from top officials from Governor Jay Nixon's office.

Mo. House Chief Ends Subpoenas For Gov's Staff

Jul 8, 2013
Tim Bommel, Mo. House Communications

Missouri's top House official has dropped an attempt to subpoena members of Gov. Jay Nixon's administration to testify before a committee he created.

House Speaker Tim Jones had subpoenaed five current Nixon staffers and his former Revenue Department director to testify about changes that were made in Missouri's procedures for issuing driver's licenses.

The six people all declined to appear as directed by the subpoenas last month, and a Cole County judge temporarily blocked the subpoenas from being enforced.

Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio.

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon’s Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about the week’s politics.

On this week's 4th of July show: the gang discusses Governor Nixon's move to hold $400 million from the budget, his numerous vetoes, the Department of Revenue document scanning developments, and St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley's six-figure donation from libertarian Rex Sinquefield.

Follow Chris McDaniel on Twitter@csmcdaniel

The dome of the Missouri Capitol.
Flickr | jimbowen0306

Perhaps in an effort to put an end to an ongoing political battle over the practice, Gov. Jay Nixon has signed legislation blocking the Department of Revenue from scanning and storing documents required to get a driver's license.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated 4:38 p.m.

A Missouri House committee formed to investigate the Department of Revenue’s scanning of driver’s license applicants’ documents has begun two days of hearings into the controversy.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Legislation is on its way to Governor Jay Nixon (D) that would forbid the Missouri Department of Revenue from scanning and storing source documents of driver's license and non-driver's license applicants.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Gov. Jay Nixon announced Wednesday that he would reduce staff and services at the Division of Motor Vehicles if the General Assembly passes a budget funding two-thirds of its fiscal year budget.

But the chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee said such a move is unnecessary -- and added that the legislature needs to pursue its plan to  force the agency to change how it issues driver's licenses.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Governor Jay Nixon (D) is threatening to lay off state workers unless Republican lawmakers fully fund the Missouri Department of Revenue's Motor Vehicles Division for a full fiscal year.

The warning comes one day after House and Senate budget negotiators agreed to only fund the state division for eight months, as a means of pressuring state Revenue officials to stop scanning and storing source documents of driver's license applicants.  Nixon says he'll treat the 8-month appropriation as a full year's funding if GOP leaders don’t reverse themselves.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri House and Senate budget negotiators have crafted a final version of next year's state budget.

The nearly $25 billion spending plan includes a $66 million increase for K-12 schools, and a $25 million hike for state universities and community colleges.  It still does not include the Medicaid expansion proposed by Governor Jay Nixon (D), which disappointed committee member and State Senator Kiki Curls (D, Kansas City).

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