Missouri House of Representatives

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

A Missouri House committee has rejected a proposal to downsize its own chamber.

The proposed constitutional amendment would have reduced the state House from 163 members to 103 members starting in 2015. A House committee voted Thursday to reject the plan.

Critics have expressed concerns that the smaller number of lawmakers would mean the public would not be as effectively represented.

Supporters say that reducing the number of lawmakers would help state government save money.

(via Flickr/dbking)

The so-called Aerotropolis bill has received first-round approval in the Missouri House.   If passed, it would provide up to $480 million in tax credits to encourage global air trade via St. Louis, including incentive for companies to build storage facilities near Lambert International Airport.  It’s sponsored by GOP House Member Caleb Jones of Moniteau County.

Mo. House of Representatives

The Missouri House has given first-round approval to a Republican-proposed map that would redraw the state’s congressional districts, reducing them from nine to eight.

It eliminates the St. Louis-area district currently held by Democrat Russ Carnahan.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Missouri’s state budget for next year has been passed by the State House

The $23 billion spending plan for Fiscal Year 2012 holds current K-12 funding levels in place while cutting funds for higher education by seven percent.

Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri House has started debating the $23 billion state budget for next year.

The tone of the debate continues to be mild, with Democrats holding the view that there’s not much money to fight over.

Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri House has passed legislation to ban so-called “late term” abortions in the Show-Me State.

The bill would ban abortions after 20 weeks unless two doctors verify that a fetus is either not viable or is a medical threat to the mother.

(via Flickr/kcdsTM)

Missouri House members have approved legislation expanding the state's concealed gun laws.

The measure would lower Missouri's minimum age for getting a permit to carry a concealed gun from 23 to 21 years old. It also would allow legislative staff members and statewide elected officials who have permits to carry concealed guns in the Capitol.

Lawmakers who have permits already can bring a concealed weapon to their meetings.

The legislation was approved 117-38 on Thursday. It now goes to the Senate.

Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

The House Budget Committee has quickly wrapped up work on Missouri’s state budget for Fiscal Year 2012.

The process of voting 13 budget bills out of committee is often raucous and can take several days to do.  This year, it only took an hour, with each budget bill passing overwhelmingly.

(via Flickr/Robert S. Donovan)

The Missouri House has given first-round approval to legislation that would require driver’s license tests to be given in English only.

Supporters say doing so would help immigrants assimilate easier into American culture and promote safety, since road signs in Missouri are in English.

(Office of Chris Kelly)

The amount Missouri hospitals charge the state for examinations to collect evidence from sexual assault victims varies widely between hospitals.

Lawmakers say the state should set a cap on the rates it pays.

Data from the Department of Public Safety shows the state paid $35.40 for a lab test at a Kansas City hospital and more than $1,500 for an examination at a Harrisonville hospital. The state paid an average of about $784 per examination last year.

(Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio)

St. Louis area medical professionals are throwing their support behind a bill making its way through the Missouri legislature. The bill would help protect high school athletes from concussions.

Among other measures, the High School Sports Brain Injury Prevention Act would require student athletes to be cleared by a doctor before returning to play or practice.

Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri House has passed legislation to limit where and when funeral protesters can demonstrate.

The action comes despite this week’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling that threw out a lawsuit against a fundamentalist church that holds protests at military funerals.

Legislation that would bar the state minimum wage from exceeding the federal rate has passed the Missouri House

A ballot initiative passed in 2006 raised Missouri’s minimum wage to $6.50 an hour and tied future increases to the rate of inflation.

Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Updating you on a story about the first vote yesterday, the Missouri House has, with their second vote today, approved legislation to allow for a tax amnesty period.

Delinquent Missouri taxpayers would get a chance to pay off their debts without owing penalties or interest under the legislation.

(via Flickr/k763)
  • According to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, St. Charles and St. Charles County leaders say they will push ahead in the fight against anti-gay protests at military funerals. That's a despite a U.S. Supreme Court ruling Wednesday in favor of such demonstrators. In an 8-to-1 ruling, the high court said Kansas-based Westboro Baptist Church doesn't have to pay damages to the family of a Marine from Maryland.
Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri House has given first-round approval to legislation that would prohibit the state's minimum wage from exceeding the federal rate.

In 2006, Missouri voters approved a ballot initiative that set the state's minimum wage at $6.50 an hour, and allowed future minimums to rise based on the rate of inflation.  It now matches the federal level of $7.25 an hour.

Mo. State Auditor's Office

Missouri State Auditor Tom Schweich (R) says he supports legislation that would require details about the governor's flights around the state to be posted to a state website.

The bill in question has been approved by the Missouri House and is now before the Senate.

The Missouri House has voted to change the state's laws about workplace discrimination.

In a 95-59 vote Thursday, the House passed legislation that would change the legal standard people must meet when alleging in a lawsuit that they were fired for discriminatory reasons. The bill now goes to the Senate.

(via Flickr/ **Maurice**)

Missouri lawmakers have endorsed legislation intended to limit lawsuits against large-scale animal farms.

Bills given initial approval Wednesday in the House and Senate would affect nuisance lawsuits against the owners of land used for agricultural purposes such as animal or crop production.

Numerous lawsuits have been filed in Missouri in recent years alleging that odors from large barns of hogs are a nuisance to neighbors.

Missouri House members have voted without dissent to require information about the governor's travel to be posted on a state website.