Missouri Public Service Commission

Former Sen. Maida Coleman
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

You could say Maida Coleman has come full circle.

The former state senator worked at the public service commission back in the 1980s. There, she was a clerk who certified trucks that traversed across the state.

Flash forward to Thursday, and Coleman is about to return to the agency that regulates public utilities – but on a different level. Gov. Jay Nixon tapped Coleman to serve as a PSC commissioner, effective Aug. 10. She replaces Robert Kenney, a St. Louis attorney who was nearing the end of his six-year stint on the PSC.

electric lines
Tom Taker via Flickr

St. Louisans wishing to comment on the possibility of an increase in their electric bill will have two chances to speak with the Missouri agency that regulates investor-owned utilities Monday.

The Missouri Public Service Commission is holding a public hearing at noon at the Holiday Inn on Watson Road near Kirkwood and another at 6 p.m. at St. Louis Community College-Florissant Valley.

Image courtesy of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources

The Missouri Public Service Commission has signed off on Ameren Missouri's plan to build a coal ash landfill at its power plant in Franklin County.

The five member commission unanimously granted the utility company’s request for a Certificate of Convenience and Necessity on Wednesday. That certificate gives Ameren the ability to expand the area of its Labadie power plant to build the new landfill.

Maria Altman|St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri Coalition for the Environment and several solar panel companies have filed a lawsuit against the Missouri Public Service Commission in an effort to keep the state’s solar rebate program alive.

(Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio)

On Tuesday night at Harris Stowe University, St. Louis area residents will finally get a chance to weigh in on a utility battle that – one way or another -- will likely affect how much they pay for electricity.

Conducted by Missouri’s Public Service Commission (PSC), which oversees utilities, the 6 p.m. hearing will center on two dueling narratives:

File photo

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has nominated state Sen. Scott T. Rupp, R-Wentzville, to a seat on the Missouri Public Service Commission, which oversees public utilities that operate in the state.

The five-person PSC is among the state’s most powerful agencies, and among the most lucrative for commission members, who each earn close to $100,000 a year. The commission also regulates Missouri’s mobile home, modular unit and recreational vehicle industries.

Veronique LaCapra/St. Louis Public Radio

A Missouri Senate energy committee has advanced legislation that would let power companies seek permission for an infrastructure surcharge.

Under legislation approved by the committee with two dissenting votes Wednesday, power companies could seek to levy the surcharge between formal rate cases.

Missouri Solar Energy Industry Association

A state appeals court has upheld regulations implementing Missouri’s renewable energy standard.

Kevin Gunn chairs the Missouri Public Service Commission, the state regulatory agency that developed the regulations (4 CSR 240-20.100).

(Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio)

The Public Service Commission heard details Monday on Ameren Missouri’s proposed efficiency plan.

The proposal is designed to promote energy efficiency while still allowing the St. Louis-based utility to earn a profit.  It has an estimated price tag of $145 million and it would be paid by the utility’s customers, whose residential bills on average would be about $3 a month higher.  But Ameren Missouri’s Warren Wood says if approved, customers would save money in the long run.

(Mo. Public Service Commission)

 A Missouri utility regulator is resigning next month from the Missouri Public Service Commission.

Jeff Davis said Friday his resignation from the commission would be effective Jan. 16. Davis joined the Public Service Commission in 2004 and served as the chairman from 2005 to 2009. His six-year term on the commission was expiring in April.

Fergus Randall | Flickr

The Missouri Public Service Commission will take Laclede Gas Co. to court in a dispute over records of gas
purchases made by one of the utility's affiliates.

The commission's staff has been trying for three years to obtain information on gas transactions made by Laclede Energy Resources, a gas marketing company not regulated by the state.