Missouri Republican Party

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

The Republican supermajority in the Missouri House inched up this week with the election of Republican Mike Moon of Lawrence County to the vacant House District 157 seat from southwestern Missouri.  Moon defeated Democrat and former House Member Charlie "Doc" Dake in what Republican Speaker Tim Jones described as a hotly-contested race.

(via Friends of Shane Schoeller)

A former southwest Missouri lawmaker has been chosen as executive director of the Missouri Republican Party.

Former state Rep. Shane Schoeller, of Willard, was selected Thursday to oversee the daily operations of the Republican Party.

Schoeller lost an election last November for secretary of state and previously served six years in the House, rising to the number two spot as House speaker pro tem.

He succeeds Lloyd Smith, who resigned last month as executive director to make an unsuccessful bid for Congress.

Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio

In a narrow victory on Saturday, Ed Martin edged out incumbent David Cole to become the new Missouri GOP Chairman.

Many speculate David Cole was ousted because of the GOP's poor performance in statewide races, where the party lost five out of the six races, in spite of Republican Mitt Romney carrying the state by over 10 points. But it's worth noting that Martin chaired the Missouri GOP's Victory 2012 Campaign, which resulted in only one victory for the party.

This Week's Politically Speaking Podcast

Jan 3, 2013
Alex Heuer

We're back! It's the first Politically Speaking podcast of the new year.

St. Louis Public Radio's Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon's Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to discuss what's ahead in the rapidly approaching legislative session, who will be the Missouri GOP's next chairman and some personnel changes in the St. Louis mayoral race.

Follow Chris McDaniel on Twitter@csmcdaniel

Follow Jo Mannies on Twitter@jmannies

Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

The start of the 2013 legislative session will mark a decade of Republican leadership in the Missouri Legislature.

It was in January 2003 that Republicans took complete control of both chambers. Since then, they have cut both taxes and government services.

(Office of Congresswoman Jo Ann Emerson)

There will be no repeat of the big-dollar, negative primary that plagued Missouri's Republican Senate contest when GOP leaders meet next year to select a replacement candidate for retiring Congresswoman Jo Ann Emerson.

That's because there will be no primary election at all - no chance for rank-and-file Republicans or Democrats to cast their votes.

Nominees will be selected by committees of party officials from southeast Missouri. Only then will one Republican and one Democratic candidate be submitted to voters in a special election.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Updated at 2:02 with McCaskill's finances.

In spite of repeated assurances that they wouldn't support Congressman Todd Akin's senate bid after his damning comments regarding "legitimate rape," the National Republican Senatorial Committee funneled $756,000 into Akin's campaign during the days before the election.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Missouri Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon spent his first term compromising with and sometimes challenging the Republican-led Legislature. But now Nixon faces supermajorities in both the House and Senate with enough Republicans to override his vetoes.

 Republicans will control 24 of the 34 Senate seats for the 2013 legislative session. House Republicans will have 110 of 163 districts. House Speaker Tim Jones says he hopes the new dynamic will prompt earlier discussion and negotiation between legislative leaders and Nixon.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Most of the Republican nominees for statewide offices in Missouri are touring the state together in a bus today and Wednesday.

The first stop was outside the GOP’s campaign office in Jefferson City.  Those onboard this morning included Lt. Governor Peter Kinder, who's seeking a third term in office; Secretary of State hopeful Shane Schoeller; Attorney General nominee Ed Martin; Congressman Blaine Luetkemeyer, whose district will include Jefferson City next year; State Treasurer nominee Cole McNary; and the Republican hoping to oust Democrat Jay Nixon from the Governor’s office, Dave Spence.

(via John Brunner for Senate; file photo; Wikimedia Commons/U.S. House of Representatives).

Most of the people gathered outside of Washington University’s Edison Theater before a recent GOP Senate Primary debate already knew who they were voting for.  

But Shelby Hewerdine wasn’t sure yet.

So, she drove in from St. Charles to get a better feel for the character of each candidate.

“I don’t know how else people are going to look at it because they are very similar on the issues, so, we’ll see,” Hewerdine said.  

And during the debate, the three main candidates laid out basically the same policy platform. 

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