Missouri Supreme Court

(via Flickr/david_shane)

A special commission that nominates candidates for the Missouri Supreme Court has given Gov. Jay Nixon the choice of an attorney, a trial judge or an appeals court judge to fill a vacancy.

The three finalists announced Thursday for the state's highest court are:

(St. Louis Public Radio)

In March, the Missouri Supreme Court heard a case regarding the constitutionality of a state tax credit which, as we stated then, enabled St. Louis developer Paul McKee to buy up several tracts of land on the city’s north side.

At that time, McKee had received $28 million in tax credits for his NorthSide project and St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay signed off on the project in February.

Today, the Missouri Supreme Court said that the tax credit is, indeed, constitutional.

When the case was heard in March, attorney Irene Smith, who represents plaintiffs and North St. Louis residents Barbara Manzara and Keith Marquard,  said that the tax credit violates the state constitution by giving state tax dollars to private business interests.

The Supreme Court cited a couple different reasons for their decision.

The Supreme Court of Missouri
via Flickr | david_shane

Thirteen people have submitted applications to fill a soon-to-be-open seat on the Missouri Supreme Court.

The three women and 10 men are vying for the seat of Judge Michael Wolff, who will retire August 11th. They are:

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

William Ray Price Jr.’s two-year term as Chief Justice of the Missouri Supreme Court ends today.

He spent his last full day in charge talking to reporters about several topics, including the need to fund the state’s drug courts.  Price says that drugs are the “leading, driving force” behind crime nationwide.

Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri Supreme Court heard arguments today over the constitutionality of a state tax credit which has enabled St. Louis developer Paul McKee to buy up several tracts of land on the city’s north side.

McKee has so far received $28 million in tax credits for his NorthSide development project.

(via Flickr/steakpinball)

History buff? Legal enthusiast? Generally curious about Missouri's past? Get excited.

The Missouri State Archives will be posting thousands of old state Supreme Court cases online for the public to view beginning late next year.

The Secretary of State's office says the State Archives has received a grant of more than $148,000 from the federal government for the project.

(St. Louis Metropolitan Police Dept. via UPI)

The Missouri Supreme Court has upheld the sentence of a St. Louis teenager who was 15 when he shot and killed a St. Louis police officer.

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