Missouri Veto Session 2013 | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Veto Session 2013

Gov. Jay Nixon speaks to a class at Rockwood Summit High School in Fenton.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

(Updated at 1 p.m. Monday with additional comments from House Speaker Tim Jones.)

Gov. Jay Nixon proved that he can outdo himself, at least when it comes to vetoing legislation. 

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Democrats in the Missouri House unveiled on Monday their proposal to cut taxes, as Republican leaders prepare to attempt another major tax cut.

Currently, the top state income tax rate in Missouri is 6 percent.  The Democrats' proposal, House Bill 1328, would lower that rate to 4 percent for residents earning $30,000 a year or less.  Those earning just over $30,000 up to $300,000 a year would still pay a 6 percent rate, while the rate for those earning more than $300,000 a year would rise to 8 percent.  The bill is sponsored by state Rep. Jon Carpenter, D-Gladstone.

Mo. Senate

A Kansas City lawmaker is proposing legislation next year to address the so-called "Border War" between Missouri and Kansas over businesses weighing whether to relocate or stay put.

State Sen. Ryan Silvey, R-Kansas City, says his proposal would create a bilateral agreement between Kansas and Missouri, forbidding them from offering incentives to entice companies to move across the border to their opposite state.

File photo | Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

There could be an effort next year to change the law allowing Missouri lawmakers and others to carry guns at the State Capitol. A loaded handgun was found by police in the basement of the Capitol last week.  It had been left in a men's bathroom on top of a toilet paper dispenser.  Police discovered that it belonged to a staff member of Republican House Speaker Tim Jones, and that the staffer does have a conceal-carry permit.  Jacob Hummel, the top Democrat in the Missouri House, says only law enforcement officers should be allowed to carry arms at the State Capitol.

Mo. House Communications

The so-called "Famous 15" Missouri Republican House Members who voted "no" on a controversial tax cut bill during last week's veto session are set to meet Friday to plan their next steps.

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Beacon.

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon’s Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about the week’s politics.

On this week's show, Senate President Pro Tem Tom Dempsey joins us to give a post-mortem of last week's veto session. The Republican goes into great detail on why he voted against the much-covered gun nullification bill, as well as what we can expect out of next year's session.

Follow Chris McDaniel on Twitter@csmcdaniel

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Some of the 15 Missouri Republican House members who voted against overriding a veto of a controversial tax cut bill say they're not worried about any negative fallout or consequences they may face.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: If this past veto session were judged by the sheer amount of legislative activity, it was an unqualified success.

Whether it met expectations, however, is a completely different story.

Politically Speaking: Veto Session Review

Sep 12, 2013

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon’s Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about the week’s politics.

On this week's show, we take a look at the just concluded veto session, and break down the key bills and votes. We discuss the income tax cut bill's failure, as well as who gets the credit or blame. Then we discuss the nullification bill -- as well as the Doe Run bill and the other nine veto overrides.

Follow Chris McDaniel on Twitter@csmcdaniel

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The Missouri House has killed the tax-cut bill that had been the marquee legislative issue this year, falling 15 votes short of the number needed after it had been vetoed by Gov. Jay Nixon.

But it fell to the state Senate to kill – by one vote – HB436, the bill that sought to nullify federal gun laws. The measure also would have barred publication of the name of any gun owner and, according to law enforcement groups, would have prevented any joint state-federal task forces on law enforcement issues.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The Missouri General Assembly’s nationally watched veto session has prompted sharply different reactions from state Republicans and Democrats, who both hope to capitalize on the results.

A GOP lawmaker says he's committed to launching an effort to change the state’s constitution through amendment, while the state Democratic Party hopes the controversial veto votes will prompt more campaign cash.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The Missouri tax-cut bill died Wednesday when the House fell 15 votes short of the number needed to override Gov. Jay Nixon's veto.

The final vote was 94-67 in favor of an override; 109 supportive votes were needed. The tally came after more than an hour of heated debate.

Vetoed Missouri Gun Bill At A Glance

Sep 11, 2013
Black semi-automatic pistol
(via Flickr/kcds)

Today’s veto session includes a look at a bill impacting Missouri gun laws. 

Here's a quick overview of the bill: 

Live Blog & Round-Up: Missouri Veto Session 2013

Sep 11, 2013
File photo | Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

From gun control to a controversial tax cut, this year's veto session in the Missouri Legislature was one to watch.

We had a live blog during all of the developments, which you can read through still below our summaries. Here are a few things to take away:

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The showdown between Missouri's Democratic Governor and the Republican-led General Assembly finally arrives this week, as lawmakers return to Jefferson City for their annual veto session.  Governor Jay Nixon struck down 29 bills this year, with most of the post-veto attention falling on two bills in particular, a controversial tax cut proposal and an even more controversial attempt to nullify federal gun control laws.  St. Louis Public Radio's Marshall Griffin takes a look at what may or may not happen on Wednesday.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: It wasn’t too long ago that the General Assembly’s veto session was nothing more than a date on a calendar, with little or no importance in Missouri's political universe.

Rick Perry wants Missouri employers to head to Texas.
Jo Mannies | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Texas Gov. Rick Perry exhorted like-minded low-tax conservatives Thursday night to take action to persuade Missouri legislators to overturn Gov. Jay Nixon’s veto of the tax-cut bill that has consumed this summer’s political debate.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: In preparation for his trip here next week, Texas Gov. Rick Perry, a Republican, has launched an unusual TV and radio ad campaign in Missouri that he says is “highlighting Texas' commitment to keeping taxes low on families and job creators.”

Texas doesn't have an income tax, but does have a higher sales tax than Missouri.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has accused some legislators – and notably House Speaker Tim Jones – of seeking to making Missouri “a safe haven’’ for young sex offenders if they follow through with an effort to override his veto of a bill to remove sex offenders under the age of 18 from law enforcement sex-offender websites.

Nixon called the bill in question, House Bill 301, a "dangerous bill'' that threatens public safety.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Amid all the negotiations about veto overrides, Missouri’s huge bloc of House Republicans have yet another matter to decide at the same time: Who will be the next House speaker?

For several years now, the state GOP has been so confident about maintaining control of the Missouri House that the party’s legislators have taken to electing a “speaker-designate’’ more than a year ahead of the switch.

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