Monsanto

Monsanto
St. Louis Public Radio

When you ask people what they think of Monsanto, it doesn’t take long for the four-letter word to come out.

"I hate Monsanto," Jackie King said emphatically, while shopping at the farmer’s market in Tower Grove Park.

King said she doesn’t like GMOs, or genetically modified organisms, that Monsanto helped pioneer in the 1980s. The subject of GMOs came up a lot, but shoppers at the market looking over locally-grown vegetables voiced a lot of concerns about the company, from patented seeds to its impacts on small farmers.

Monsanto
St. Louis Public Radio

Monsanto launched a new national advertising campaign Wednesday that focuses on something everyone can relate to: food.

It’s part of an effort at Monsanto to improve the St. Louis-based company’s image. Earlier this year the Harris Poll on corporate reputations ranked Monsanto third worst in the country, just behind BP.

Ed Spevak / Saint Louis Zoo

Monsanto will continue selling soybean seeds coated with pesticides that have been linked to honey bee deaths, even though the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency found the seeds do not improve yields.

The seeds in question are treated with a class of chemicals called neonicotinoids, which are chemically similar to nicotine.

(courtesy Monsanto)

Monsanto is committing $1 million to support Ferguson and surrounding north St. Louis County communities.

Chairman and CEO Hugh Grant said Monsanto took its time and tried to strike the right balance between donating to short-term and long-term initiatives.

"[The non-profits] are also a balance of agencies we’ve worked with for many, many years and also some new initiatives that I think have tremendous potential to make change in the long-term," Grant said.

(Flickr)

Monsanto Corporation has reported a security breach in its Precision Planting unit, putting some farmers’ credit card and tax information at risk.

The world’s largest seed company sent a letter to the attorney general of Maryland, according a report by Bloomberg News. Monsanto said personal information of 14 residents may have been accessed.

GMO Critics Protest At Monsanto Headquarters

May 25, 2014
Monsanto protest
St. Louis Public Radio

Hundreds of demonstrators protested outside Monsanto’s corporate headquarters in Creve Coeur Saturday.

They called for the agriculture biotech company to end practices they say are harmful to the environment and abusive of the rights of farmers. That includes Monsanto’s development and control of genetically modified, or GMO, crops.

big data
Via Monsanto

Farmers have been collecting data about their farms for decades.

Now all those data are going high tech. Major agricultural companies like Monsanto, John Deere and DuPont have been developing more ways to mine that than ever before – all in the name of helping farmers make better decisions about when to plant, what to plant and how much.

(Flickr)

The American Farm Bureau Federation met Thursday with Monsanto and several other agribusiness companies, such as DuPont and John Deere, to talk about the use of big data in agriculture.

The meeting comes as farmers grapple with whether to share information with major agricultural businesses.

The Farm Bureau had been warning farmers to be cautious as Monsanto and DuPont rolled out new data services. Those services use farmers’ information, including crop yields, to determine the best seeds to use and how much to plant.

(Credit: Flickr/Sean McMenemy)

Monsanto is giving a $2.5 million grant to BioSTL, the non-profit organization that advocates for bioscience in St. Louis.

The announcement came Thursday during InvestMidwest, the venture capital conference that’s showcasing more than 40 innovative companies.

BioSTL’s mission includes growing the St. Louis area's economy through the bioscience industry.

President and CEO Donn Rubin said the grant will help the non-profit continue its work.

(via Flickr/jasonippolito)

Is there any aspect of life that technology hasn’t touched?

While I’m sure people can cite examples in the non-digital sphere, agriculture is not one of them. It hasn’t been for some time – farmers are adept at using all kinds of technology to monitor weather, pricing, soil content. But a new development is taking the idea to a new level. And St. Louis's own Monsanto seems to be leading the way.

Maria Altman (St. Louis Public Radio and The Beacon)

Ten protesters were arrested outside Monsanto’s headquarters during its annual shareholder meeting Tuesday. The arrests happened shortly after the shareholders failed to pass two resolutions that would have changed Monsanto's policies on its Genetically Modified Organism products.

Adam Eidinger, one of the protesters, is also a Monsanto shareholder.

He proposed one of the resolutions. It asked that Monsanto work with the Federal Drug Administration to label genetically modified food.

Monsanto
St. Louis Public Radio

Monsanto is no stranger to battling the controversy over Genetically Modified Organisms, or GMOs.  Some of that controversy will come to Monsanto’s doorstep Tuesday afternoon during the company’s annual shareholder meeting.

Several groups have promised to protest outside the meeting, where two resolutions dealing with GMOs are likely to be introduced.

One resolution asks that the company work with the federal government to develop GMO labeling on food.

Mark Brown
Provided by Mr. Brown

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - Mark Brown, who owns Gateway Garlic Urban Farm in St. Louis and grows grains near Booneville, didn’t start out being against genetically modified organisms (GMOs). “I wasn’t anti-Monsanto,” he says. “I barely knew who they were.” 

He didn’t know he had bought anything from Monsanto until a letter came from the company after he bought GMO sweet corn from a third-party seed supplier that didn’t reveal its source.

Monsanto
St. Louis Public Radio

The world headquarters of agriculture company Monsanto was the site of a weekend demonstration organized by opponents of genetically modified food.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that 500 demonstrators marched Saturday to the company's Creve Coeur global headquarters, where they chanted anti-Monsanto slogans and waded into street traffic.

Organizers of the "March Against Monsanto" want the company to label food containing genetically modified ingredients.

(via Flickr/s_falkow)

A Missouri appeals court has ruled that a jury should decide whether Monsanto's chemical production division is responsible for cancers allegedly caused by the widespread use of certain toxic chemicals in everyday products.

Over the course of several decades, Monsanto manufactured 99 percent of the polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCB's, found in the world. High concentrations of the chemicals can cause non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and other forms of cancer.

The strange case of genetically engineered wheat on a farm in Oregon remains as mysterious as ever. If anything, it's grown more baffling.

Monsanto
St. Louis Public Radio

A Monsanto researcher is one of the winners of the 2013 World Food Prize.

Monsanto Chief Technology Officer Robert Fraley will share the international honor with Mary-Dell Chilton of Syngenta and Belgian plant scientist Marc Van Montagu.

Monsanto
St. Louis Public Radio

Opponents of agribusiness giant Monsanto say they expect as many as 500 people to gather at the company’s Creve Coeur headquarters Saturday for a protest.

The 1 p.m. rally is part of a larger March Against Monsanto taking place in several U.S. and foreign cities.

Daniel Romano with Safe Food Action St. Louis says he thinks people are ready to vent their frustration over Monsanto’s practices and power.

A unanimous Supreme Court ruled Monday that an Indiana farmer infringed on Monsanto's patent when he planted soybeans that had been genetically modified by Monsanto without buying them from the agribusiness giant.

Monsanto
St. Louis Public Radio

The Supreme Court has sustained Monsanto Co.'s claim that an Indiana farmer violated the company's patents on soybean seeds that are resistant to its weed-killer.

The justices, in a unanimous vote Monday, rejected the farmer's argument that cheap soybeans he bought from a grain elevator are not covered by the Monsanto patents, even though most of them also were genetically modified to resist the company's Roundup herbicide.

Monsanto
St. Louis Public Radio

Agribusiness giant Monsanto has announced a $400 million expansion at its suburban Chesterfield research center.

The company plans to add 36 new greenhouses, plus additional "plant growth chambers," offices and laboratory space at the Chesterfield Village Research Center, on the former Pfizer campus.  According to Monsanto the project will add as many as 675 jobs over the next three years

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon was on hand to announce the expansion at Chicago’s International Bio Convention.

(via Monsanto)

Monsanto says its net income increased 22 percent in the second quarter on strong sales of its biotech seeds.

The agricultural products company boosted its full-year earnings guidance, citing its strong performance in the first two quarters.

The St. Louis company says it earned $1.48 billion, or $2.74 per share in the three months ended Feb. 13. That compares to earnings of $1.21 billion, or $2.24 per share, a year ago.

Revenue climbed 15 percent to $5.47 billion.

Genetically-modified seeds — and the technology to produce them — have been at the center of a bitter legal fight between the two companies. Dupont will pay Monsanto more than $1.5 billion in the deal. With that, the companies will drop their patent and antitrust claims against each other.

(via Flickr/mike matney)

Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments in a legal battle between St. Louis-based Monsanto and a 75-year-old farmer from Indiana named Vernon Hugh Bowman.

While some Supreme Court justices have already tipped their hat signifying Monsanto will likely win the case, the issue revolves around whether Bowman violated Monsanto’s patent rights when he planted soybean seeds from a grain elevator.

(Dan Charles/NPR)

Updated on Tuesday, February 19, at 6:10 p.m. to add quote from Bowman.

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments today in a legal battle between St. Louis-based Monsanto and a 75-year-old Indiana farmer.

The case revolves around whether Vernon Hugh Bowman violated Monsanto's patent rights when he bought seeds from a grain elevator and planted them.

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