Mother to Mother

Willis Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

Brittany Packnett. Johnetta Elzie. Patricia Bynes. Pastor Traci Blackmon. Alexis Templeton. The list goes on.

The movement that began in Ferguson last summer has been led by dozens of women; local residents who became activists overnight, state legislators and community leaders who facilitated discussions and protests.

Courtesy of The Ethics Project

Nine African-American fathers, each from different backgrounds, spoke Tuesday about their experiences with police harassment, their fears for their children and their hopes for a stronger community.

The Father-2-Father panel at Greater St. Mark Family Church in Dellwood included educators, businessmen, clergy leaders and law enforcement officials.

Ferguson resident and panelist Charles Henson, said he attended because a father to father, man to man conversation is needed.

Provided by Missouri History Museum

When radio personality Carol Daniel and her husband, Patrick Daniel, learned she was pregnant with a boy, her first reaction was sheer joy. "I had had nightmares that I would not get married or that I would not have a child," she said.

But that joy quickly turned to anxiety. "My first thought was, 'I'm having a black man.' "

/ Photo provided by Eileen Duggan

If you ever listened to you mother — really listened, you probably learned some very valuable lessons.

For Eileen Duggan, one of those lessons has served her well in her years as a piano teacher.

“She taught me the importance of establishing a studio policy, and treating the career as a business.” Duggan wrote, in response to questions through our Public Insight Network. Her mother, Frances Duggan, taught piano for 55 years. 

(Julie Bierach/St. Louis Public Radio)

Ask any mother about the happiest moment of their life and they will most likely tell you ‘the birth of their child.' But for some women, the moments that follow childbirth are not happy at all.

For 20 years, women struggling with a variety of emotional issues after childbirth could reach out to the St. Louis nonprofit organization Mother To Mother for free. But at the end of the year, the organization is closing because of financial troubles.