This CT scan of the mummy Henut-Wedjebu, an upper class Egyptian woman who lived about 3,400 years ago, shows small shiny objects that appear to float around her head. These could be glass beads, embedded in a wig or shroud.
Washington University

Barnes-Jewish Hospital had some unusual “patients” on Sunday: three ancient Egyptian mummies.

Washington University radiologists put each mummy through a CT scanner, which uses X-rays to “see” through the mummies’ wrappings, and high-powered computing to generate detailed, 3-D images of the tissues, bones and organs underneath.

The mummies were already X-rayed in the late '60s, and two were CT-scanned in the '90s.

Saint Louis Science Center

The Saint Louis Science Center’s current exhibition Lost Egypt: Ancient Secrets, Modern Science has sparked an interest in the afterlife in ancient Egyptian culture.  Earlier this month, Michele Loyet, Adjunct Professor on Near Eastern and Egyptian Archaeology  at Webster University, spoke at the Science Center on the topic of mummification in Egypt.  She was Don Marsh’s guest on St. Louis on the Air to talk about the afterlife tradition in ancient Egypt.