Museum Of Contemporary Religious Art

Salma Arastu

Artist Salma Arastu knows a thing or two about intercultural communication. She was born in India and raised in Hinduism before embracing Islam through her marriage. Now, she uses that melded faith background to build religious bridges through her artwork: Arabic calligraphy melded with abstract expressionist paintings.

A photo from Regina DeLuise's Bhutan exhibit at the Museum of Contemporary Religious Art in St. Louis.
Regina DeLuise

Photographer Regina DeLuise took a chance and ended up in Bhutan.

“Oftentimes in my life and in my career, I’ll just kind of throw my hat far over the fence somewhere and then go collect it and see what happens,” DeLuise told “Cityscape” host Steve Potter. “It was a very amazing trip. (A) very special place.”

An overview of Rebecca Niederlander's installation at the Museum of Contemporary Religious Art at Saint Louis University in St. Louis.
Jeffrey Vaughn / Courtesy of the Museum of Contemporary Religious Art

After 20 years, the Museum of Contemporary Religious Art has its first site-specific installation.

“During our first 20 years, we had thematic shows that often included many artists,” museum director the Rev. Terry Dempsey told “Cityscape” host Steve Potter. “Each one of the works that is in place over at MOCRA right now is essential to the other works that are there. This is very special.”

Lewis deSoto, Paranirvana, 1999-2012, installed at MOCRA in 2013.
Courtesy of the artist and Brian Gross Fine Art, San Francisco

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: An invitation to cross thresholds into unfamiliar territory is the theme as Saint Louis University’s Museum of Contemporary Religious Art marks two decades of existence. “Thresholds: MOCRA at 20” is a two-part exhibit reprising segments of previous shows dating back to the museum’s 1993 debut. Part One, open through Dec. 15, revisits MOCRA’s first 10 years.

(Courtesy: Jack Rutberg Fine Arts) Work By: Patrick Graham1998-99 Oil and mixed media on canvas diptych 72 x 132 in.

Host Steve Potter talks with guests about an exhibit and discussion on the work of Patrick Graham at Saint Louis University's Museum of Contemporary Religious Art (MOCRA).

Potter’s guests include Jack Rutberg, Director of Jack Rutberg Fine Arts, Father Terry Dempsey, Director of the the Museum of Contemporary Religious Art at Saint Louis University, and Eamonn Wall, the Smurfit-Stone Professor of Irish Studies and Professor of English, University of Missouri - St. Louis.