Music

Provided by iLLPHONICS

Updated Sept. 7 with additional information about producing entities. Updated Sept. 9 with audio from St. Louis on the Air.

The seventh annual LouFest will bring hip-hop, rock, and jazz acts to Forest Park this weekend.

LouFest has grown steadily since its debut in 2010 and the last three years have seen a marked increase in attendance.


Provided by Washington University

Many in the United States likely view Iran as a closed society, one that has limited contact with the western world. But many in Iran would like to see more cultural exchanges.

Among them is Grammy-nominated Iranian musician Hossein Alizadeh, who performs Sunday at Washington University. An avant-garde musician, Alizadeh is known improvising on the radif, a  traditional Persian musical instrument. He has toured the world extensively and taught music in Europe and the Middle East.

Ron Campbell's Blue Meanie reclines on the words "all you need is love" whith the Yellow Submarine in the background.
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

The Beatles seem to be invading St. Louis once again. This summer Paul McCartney will perform at Busch Stadium, to mark the 50th anniversary of the Beatles's legendary performance at the old stadium. This weekend provides a chance to meet an artist who helped build the group's legacy, Ron Campbell.

“The Beatles fans, they spend their whole life remembering,” said Campbell, who also worked on popular kids cartoons. “Then there’s all the fans of the cartoons; the "Scooby-Doo" fans and all the childhood memories that they have.”

Provided by David Anderson

The Tritone Expo focuses on instrument makers, recording studio representatives, and accessory manufacturers. Organizers hope it will unite different aspects of the St. Louis music scene.

“We have a whole slew of people here who are ostensibly an army of one, and we're trying to create a community around that,” said organizer Michael Tomko, “We’re showing how legitimate these companies are at manufacturing, as startups here in town.”

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

More and more people are trying to shed their heirloom pianos. While many of these instruments end up in the landfill, one St. Louis nonprofit is trying to give the instruments new life.

Composer Francis Pott and Phillip Barnes, aristic director, Saint Louis Chamber Chorus.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Love is not all sunshine and roses, especially when it comes to Valentine’s Day. That is something Saint Louis Chamber Chorus artistic director Phillip Barnes was very aware of when booking this year’s concert to be held on Feb. 14 at Second Presbyterian Church.

David Robertson conducting at Powell Hall
Dan Dreyfus | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis Symphony will return to New York’s Carnegie Hall in March 2017.

Music director David Robertson will lead the symphony and chorus in a performance of John Adams’ “Gospel According to the Other Mary.” The event pays tribute to Adams’ 70th birthday.

The performance will include an international vocal ensemble, showcasing singer Kelley O’Connor. The mezzo-soprano performed the 2013 world premiere of the title role of “Gospel”

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

The Delta Gamma Center for Children with Visual Impairments is launching a new program called “Experience the Arts,” which aims to help children who are visually impaired or blind sharpen skills and develop a love of music. It is the first program in the St. Louis area of its kind.

The program will kick off with an event on Friday night featuring Jeff Austin, the founder and former member of Yonder Mountain Spring Band. On Friday’s “St. Louis on the Air,” host Don Marsh discussed the new program with:

Show Me Arts Academy kids rehearse a dance to Bruno Mars' "Uptown Funk" during the program's launch last year
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

Nine months ago, Marty Casey launched Show Me Arts Academy in response to the shooting death of Michael Brown and the subsequent protests in Ferguson. The program tries to reach kids in poor neighborhoods who may not respond well to sports, school or other activities.

“When we take that time out and we give that special attention, you literally see their whole attitude and their world just change,” said Casey.

cello bridge
Turidoth | Wikipedia

Music therapists in Missouri who are fighting to institute statewide certification for the profession say that will improve access to patients and secure quality patient care.

Kyjuan and Murphy Lee pose for a portrait outside their new St. Charles vape lounge, Vape Ya Tailfeather.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

If you live in St. Louis you probably know the song "Shake Ya Tailfeather" by Nelly, Murphy Lee, and P. Diddy. Now Murphy Lee, 37 and his brother Kyjuan, 39, are breathing new life into the song, in an unexpected way. They’re launching the vape juice line, Vape Ya Tailfeather.

“In the music industry I think somehow if you pay attention to your surroundings, you become a marketing genius,” said Lee. “You know how to sell it because you are the brand.”

Inside Dead Wax Records on Cherokee Street
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

There’s good news for local vinyl record stores. Vinyl sales are up 50 percent this past year as we enter the peak shopping season. A number of music store owners say the increase results from a new generation discovering that vinyl offers a widely different audio experience than streaming services.

“It’s nice to be able to have everything on a system or a phone, or an iPad or a computer, but when it comes down to it the really special records are the ones that you have to hold in your hand and you have to listen to them,” said Tim Hendrickson of Dead Wax records on Cherokee.

Aine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

When it comes to priorities, Marie-Hélène Bernard will not be easily swayed. When asked by “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh whether she prefers to open her first season as president of the St. Louis Symphony  or throw out the first pitch at a Cardinals game, she made it clear that it doesn’t matter what she’s doing so long as it is connecting the local community to the symphony.

“Both are so, so exciting … exciting in a way that gets me to know the community,” said Bernard. “It is a really wonderful city.”

Fred Onovwerosuoke
Durrie Bouscaren / St. Louis Public Radio

As Hurricane Katrina bore down on New Orleans 10 years ago, St. Louis composer Fred Onovwerosuoke hurried to the attic with cardboard boxes.

But it turned out, upstairs would be the worst place to store them. Shortly after he and his wife and two small sons drove away from their temporary New Orleans home, Katrina tore away the roof, exposing reams of musicals manuscripts to the pounding rain.

Clockwise from top left, Damon Davis, Freida Wheaton, Michael Castro, Brian Owens, Lee Patton Chiles, De Nichols
St. Louis Public Radio file photos

For the past year, a tragic and powerful muse has fed the energy and work of St. Louis-area artists.

The shooting death of Michael Brown and the unpeeling of issues that followed have inspired a bounty of work with a social-justice mission. As we near the Aug. 9 anniversary of Brown’s death, we talked with a number of arts professionals about their work in the wake of the turmoil:

Syna So Pro aka Syrhea Conaway
Durrie Bouscaren

Musician Syna So Pro, aka Syrhea Conaway, has a hot date Thursday night at The Sheldon.

The St. Louis artist is the special guest of the cutting-edge classical group Alarm Will Sound. It's part of the orchestra's effort to bring together artists from "diverse and unexpected backgrounds" to collaborate and produce new music.

Fred "Fred-O" Onovwerosuoke

Last November, African Musical Arts was awarded a $50,000 Innovation Grant from the Regional Arts Commission (RAC) to fund a two-year pilot project, “The African Performing Arts Exchange.” In addition to producing concert performances and music engravings of works by African-descent composers, the exchange will offer a web-based platform to share these resources. The Exchange is the dream of African Musical Arts founder Fred “Fred-O” Onovwerosuoke. He and development director Wendy Hymes joined “Cityscape” host Steve Potter to discuss the Exchange and a concert to benefit the project.

Inside Euclid Records in Webster Groves
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

Two iconic St. Louis record stores born two years apart -- Vintage Vinyl and Euclid Records -- are entering middle age finding renewed purpose in an international celebration of selling music.

Darin Gray and Glenn Kotche of On Fillmore
Courtesy of the band

Intense friendship may not be the first thing that springs to mind when hearing the phrase “experimental music.” Yet according to founding member Darin Gray, shared personal connections motivate improvisational duo On Fillmore.

National Blues Museum Director Dion Brown
Courtesy of The National Blues Museum

The National Blues Museum continues the march toward its late 2015 opening with the hiring of its first executive director, Dion Brown. Brown says the role carries an obligation to maintain the link between blues originators and contemporary music.

A Gretsch guitar in David Anderson's shop he works on for Tritone Guitars
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

This weekend local guitar makers will leave the digital world behind, meet with each other, and invite the public to step inside the world of boutique guitar production.

Denise Thimes, Peter Martin, at the piano, Chris Thomas and Montez Coleman preform on 'City of Music.' The Nine Network series premieres March 16, 2015
Ray Marklin / Nine Network

In a two-part series, the Nine Network is exploring St. Louis’ musical legacy.

This photo of St. Louis' Big Red Burlecamp was taken in St. Charles in 1963. Big Red is in the center, with guitar.
Reedy Press

When Kenneth Johnson was a young boy growing up in rural Missouri in the 1940s, his bedtime routine included music. But the sounds that lured this youngster into dreamland were the live performances of dance-hall musicians.

Thelonius Kryptonite
Durrie Bouscaren

Ah, high school. The place where you can reinvent yourself after middle school, screw up, then graduate and reinvent yourself again. But for St. Louis musician Thelonius Kryptonite, University City High School was where he started out strong and just kept going.

It began with a little tabletop musical improvisation. Soon Kryptonite, known then as Corey Williams, began living a dual existence: joining marching band and becoming the king of hip-hop. Before graduation, he was already signed to the Soul Tide record label.

Gene Lynn on his balcony at home
Provided by the family

Gene Lynn, with a baritone voice that was as smoky as the nightclubs he owned for more than three decades, was one of the brightest lights of the St. Louis entertainment mecca known as Gaslight Square in the ’60s.

Show Me Arts Academy kids rehearse to Bruno Mars' "Uptown Funk"
Willis Ryder Arnold/St. Louis Public Radio

Frustration gripped local singer and actress Marty Casey in the days after Michael Brown’s death at the hands of then-Officer Darren Wilson. This weekend, a little more than six months later, Casey and 10 other people launched Show Me Arts Academy, the organization born from her call.

Clark Terry
Clark Terry's website

In April 2006, jazz trumpeter and St. Louis native Clark Terry talked to "Cityscape" host Steve Potter about his upcoming performance at the Greater St. Louis Jazz Festival.

By then, Clark was widely regarded as a legend. He was a star soloist with Count Basie's and Duke Ellington's bands, led his own big band, and was the first black man to play in "The Tonight Show" house band.

Country and bluegrass artist Ricky Skaggs will perform in St. Louis on Feb. 28, 2015.
Skaggs Family Records

Ricky Skaggs started playing the mandolin in the hills of Kentucky at age 5. Fifty-five years later, he’s still in love with what he calls “old-time mountain music.”

“That real traditional thread running through the fabric of the music scene, I’ve always been drawn to that,” Skaggs told “Cityscape” guest host Jim Althoff. “I’ve always felt, too, that if that particular thread ever gets pulled out, I think the whole piece of cloth can just unravel. It’s a very important part of what we need desperately to hold on to and honor.”

Professor Lerone Martin holds recording of Rev. J.M. Gates
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

The term "televangelist” was coined in a 1975 TIME magazine article to describe a practice now familiar to many Americans. Lerone Martin said that practice may stem from sermons recorded in the mid 1920s. Martin wants people to imagine a recording session with Louis Armstrong and his musicians in New York’s Columbia Records studios as one of the first bridges established between religion and mass media.

Sheldon Art Galleries Director Olivia Lahs-Gonzales takes a photo of Aurelia Hartenberger as she plays a bird ocarina from South America on 'Cityscape' on Feb. 6, 2015.
Katie Cook / St. Louis Public Radio

It started as a garage sale purchase, and grew. Last month, music professor Aurelia Hartenberger and her husband donated 2,500 instruments to the Sheldon Art Galleries.

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