National Park Service

Courtesy Missouri History Museum

If you visit the new “Arch Perspectives” exhibit at the Missouri History Museum, take the time to read the story cards written by St. Louisans about the iconic riverfront monument. The personal thoughts range from joyful to angry:

A new initiative aims to increase St. Louis youth's exposure and service at public outdoor spaces, like the Ulysses S. Grant National Historic Site (pictured), through programs, job opportunities and summer camps.
Courtesy Wikimedia Commons

St. Louis is one of 11 cities participating in a new federal initiative to get more young people to play and, one day, possibly work or volunteer on public lands. 

Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

A public meeting will be held Wednesday night at Cahokia Mounds to talk about an initiative to turn the State Historic Site into a National Historical Park.

Ed Weilbacher is with the HeartLands Conservancy, the group behind the initiative.

He said most people are surprised Cahokia isn’t a National Park already.

National Park Service

(Updated at 3:39 p.m., February 20)

Missouri senators passed a resolution to block the federal government's proposed changes in tourist restrictions at the Ozark National Scenic Riverways. The resolution passed on a 23-8 vote on Thursday and now heads to the House.

via National Park Service

 Updated 2:40 p.m. Jan. 22:

The National Park Service is holding the last public meeting on its proposed management plan for the Ozark National Scenic Riverways tonight in Kirkwood. See below for more details.

Updated 3:10 p.m. and 4:40 p.m. Jan. 7:

Courtesy CityArchRiver

Although it wasn't the "environmentally preferred" alternative of the National Park Service, federal officials have given a thumbs-up to a plan to change the Arch grounds.

Ariana Tobin / St. Louis Public Radio

The Gateway Arch in St. Louis is one the country’s most recognizable landmarks.  Its construction was completed this month, 47 years ago, in 1965.


Will be updated.

The quintessential symbol of the St. Louis region, the Gateway Arch, has been under special scrutiny lately as rusty stains on its structure caused concerns.

The National Park Service has released a report from a Chicago engineering firm today saying that the stains are merely cosmetic and that the Arch is "as sound today as the day it was built." (It was completed in 1965 - and for the history lovers out there, here's a gallery of that process).

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Clemons hearing today in St. Louis courtroom

The effort to free Reginald Clemons from Missouri's death row goes to a St. Louis courtroom starting today.

Clemons was one of four men convicted in the 1991 killings of two St. Louis-area sisters, 20-year-old Julie Kerry and 19-year-old Robin Kerry. Both girls, along with their visiting male cousin, were thrown from an abandoned Mississippi River bridge. The cousin, Thomas Cummins, survived.

(Mark Morgan/University of Missouri)

A statewide coalition of environmental organizations is urging the National Park Service to protect Ozark rivers.

Representatives of the groups were in Washington, D.C., today meeting with the Park Service.

They submitted more than 4,400 signed petitions asking the federal agency to adopt a strong management plan for the Current River and its major tributary, the Jacks Fork.

(Véronique LaCapra/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated at 6:10 pm to add Congresswoman Emerson's response.

(David Cappaert, Michigan State University)

The National Park Service is bracing for the possible loss of more than 900 trees near the Gateway Arch. That’s what could happen if the emerald ash borer makes it to the St. Louis area.

The emerald ash borer has killed millions of ash trees since it was accidentally introduced to the U.S. in the early 1990s.

(via Wikimedia Commons)

A national river quality organization has listed Missouri's Current River as a victim of over-use, and one of the most endangered rivers in America.

The report by American Rivers shows that in 1984 the Current River in the Ozark Riverways Scenic Park had only 13 access points.

Today, there are more than 130, leading to erosion, pollution and overuse.