Natural Resources Defense Council

Air Pollution
4:47 pm
Thu October 24, 2013

Smoke From Distant Wildfires Poses Health Risk To Illinois And Missouri Residents

This aerial photograph of this year's Idaho wildfires shows large smoke plumes traveling eastward.
Credit via NASA

A new report released today by the Natural Resources Defense Council warns that smoke from wildfires poses health risks to people living far from the actual blaze.

The study used data from 2011, an especially bad year for wildfires in the US, to rank states with the greatest number of residents affected by wildfire smoke for longer than a week.

Illinois and Missouri were ranked second and fourth respectively, despite having no wildfires of their own.

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Farming
12:59 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Report: 'Significant Portion' Of Extreme Weather Crop Losses Avoidable, But Some Farmers Aren't Sold

(via Flickr/Dodo-Bird)

Reporting from Harvest Public Media’s Bill Wheelhouse.

Farmers across the country received more than $17 billion in federal crop insurance payouts after last year’s drought. A report released Tuesday by an environmental group blames farmers for not doing enough to shield the soil against the heat.

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Air Pollution
5:48 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

Report: Mo, Ill. still among top power plant air pollution states as emissions reduce

Ameren’s power plant near Labadie, Mo.
Véronique LaCapra St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 6:30 p.m. to add information on mercury pollution.

A new report released today puts both Missouri and Illinois among the top 20 states with the most toxic air pollution from power plants.

The Natural Resources Defense Council report ranked Missouri 15th and Illinois 16th nationwide, based on 2010 data from the Environmental Protection Agency, the most recent data available.

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Mississippi River Basin - Nutrient Pollution
2:46 pm
Wed March 14, 2012

Environmental groups sue EPA to limit nutrient pollution in the Mississippi River Basin

This image shows water quality changes in the Gulf of Mexico. Reds and oranges represent high concentrations of algae and river sediment. Under certain conditions excessive algal growth can result in a "dead zone" of low oxygen.
(via NASA/Goddard SVS)

Updated 4:43 p.m. with comment from Glynnis Collins of the Prairie Rivers Network.

A coalition of environmental groups is taking legal action to push the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to limit nutrient pollution.

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