Neighborhood Revitalization

Participants in the Good Journey Development Foundation with mentors and instructors
The Good Journey Development Foundation

If you want to come up with a good idea for teen lives, why not ask a teenager?

That’s what a group called The Good Journey Development Foundation does. A group of 13-to-17-year-olds brainstormed a plan for a center offering employment and education tips, along with life-skills training.

Good Journey recently received $300 in seed money for the project from another organization called Better Billion, working to make St. Louis a better place to live.

On Monday morning, St.  Louisans can hear from the Good Journey kids and other Better Billion winners at the St. Louis Board of Aldermen meeting.

From left to right: Dan Lovings, Phillip Johnson, and Andy Krumsieg.
Áine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

Crumbling homes, missing bricks, dangerous streets, and crushing poverty — these details make up the overwhelming narrative of north St. Louis often offered by national media, local media and popular perception.

But Dan Lovings, a longtime St. Louis resident, moved to north St. Louis with the intention of owning and putting money into a house there. He meant to build a good home, increase property values, and join and contribute to the neighborhood. But to do so, he found, would require some individual initiative.

Michael Allen, Preservation Research Office

A part of downtown East St. Louis will likely be listed on the National Register of Historic Places by the end of September, and city officials hope that designation will spark revitalization.

The Downtown East St. Louis Historic District encompasses two blocks of Collinsville Avenue, a block and a half of Missouri Avenue and the south side of one block of St. Louis Avenue.

Jessica Baran and Galen Gondolfi
Stephanie Zimmerman | St. Louis Public Radio | File photo

Making art transforms artists. It can also revolutionize the world around them. St.

Courtesy of the Old North Restoration Group

As the population of St. Louis began to shift away from the city’s core in the 1970s, many of the city’s older neighborhoods entered a state of decline. But now, thanks in part to a renewed interest in the city’s older neighborhoods, many are experiencing renewal.

Lauer Architecture

If all goes according to plan, a hydroponics factory could soon be located on Martin Luther King Drive. It’s the newest effort by St. Louis nonprofit Beloved Streets of America to revitalize the street.

At first the factory would be located at 5901 MLK, in the back of Beloved Streets headquarters.

“It’s a big building that can be used for multiple purposes,” Beloved Streets president Melvin White said.

James McAnally
Provided by M. McAnally

The Luminary Center for the Arts credits numerous supporters, volunteers and long-range thinking for the purchase of its own building.

To be successful in the arts, a business head can be as important as a creative mind.

NathanReed / Flickr

Community leaders and local politicians from across the St. Louis region gathered at Harris Stowe University on Saturday to network and share ideas on how to build stronger neighborhoods.

The day-long event was organized by the St. Louis Association of Community Organizations (SLACO) and geared toward building connected neighborhoods from the ground up.  

SLAYCO’s Executive Director, Nancy Thompson, said developing relationships between stakeholders is critical to the region as a whole.  

(Via Flickr/pasa47)

Drive through the streets of St. Louis, and it becomes obvious that some neighborhoods are doing better than others. Overall, population is down in the city and inner ring of suburbs. But there are pockets of growth and renewal that have popped up.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis: As St. Louis grapples with its urban revival, the focus should be on building a sustainable city for tomorrow and not about recapturing the past, suggests a researcher at the Brookings Institution who will speak at a symposium Friday sponsored by the Saint Louis University Law School.

"One of the things St. Louis has to do is have a serious conversation that recognizes that it will be a smaller city with a demographic mix that is different than it was originally built to accommodate,’’ said Alan Mallach, a non-resident senior fellow at the Metropolitan Policy Program of the Brookings Institution and a visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.