neuroscience

Engineering - Neuroscience
3:50 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Tiny Implantable LED Devices Help Shed Light On The Brain

These miniaturized LED devices are small enough to safely implant in a mouse brain.
Credit University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign and Washington University-St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed miniaturized electronic devices small enough to safely insert into the brains of live mice. The tiny wireless devices can target specific brain cells and influence behavior.

University of Illinois materials scientist John Rogers co-led the study and helped design the devices. He says they’re on the same size-scale as cells, so they can penetrate far down into the brain.

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Neuroscience Research
2:27 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

First Results From Brain Mapping Project Ready For Download

A map of brain regions associated with language processing in the human cerebral cortex. Yellow and red regions are activated by listening to stories, whereas green and blue regions are more strongly activated by doing mathematical calculations.
Credit D. Barch, M. Harms, G. Burgess for the WU-Minn HCP consortium.

An international brain mapping project led by Washington University has released its first set of results.

The Human Connectome Project is a five-year effort to study brain circuits and how the wiring of the brain relates to human behavior.

Project researchers are working to obtain high-resolution brain scans of 1,200 healthy adults, along with information about their cognitive abilities, personalities, and other characteristics.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:31 am
Tue October 9, 2012

A Lively Mind: Your Brain On Jane Austen

Matt Langione, a subject in the study, reads Jane Austen's Mansfield Park. Results from the study suggest that blood flow in the brain differs during leisurely and critical reading activities.
L.A. Cicero Stanford University

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 9:35 am

At a recent academic conference, Michigan State University professor Natalie Phillips stole a glance around the room. A speaker was talking but the audience was fidgety. Some people were conferring among themselves, or reading notes. One person had dozed off.

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