Nonprofits

Trenda Davis is a member of the Independence Center's clubhouse.
Kim Oswalt | St. Louis Public Radio

At the clubhouse, there are no clients or patients – only members. In an alternative to traditional models of social work, people with mental illnesses come to the Independence Center’s clubhouse to participate in a program structured around the idea of a “work-ordered day.”

Trenda Davis is an Independence Center member who said she found stability and support when she joined the clubhouse after losing her job two years ago.

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Freiweni Mebrahtu was 13 when she first got her period. Growing up in Ethiopia, it was something her four older sisters never, ever brought up. When she went to school and asked her friends, they all vehemently denied that menstruation existed.

Her experience is not singular.

Courtesy of Raven

Joe Eulberg  doesn't remember what made him so upset that he flipped a table during an argument with his wife 20 years ago.

He does remember the outcome.

"A few days after that, Barbara, my wife, came and said you need to get help or I'm going to leave and take the kids,” Eulberg said in a recent interview with St. Louis Public Radio.

Eulberg turned for help to the Raven.

Alehra Evans and Sheila Suderwalla
Durrie Bouscaren

You can tell a lot just by just looking at Alehra Evans. That she’s a joyful, creative person, for one. Wearing a puffy white peony in her hair, sporting a gold-toned animal-print jacket and multi-layered gold earrings, she's clearly into the art of fashion.

A view of Saint Louis University Hospital, taken 02/23/15.
Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

Citing the projected demand for primary care physicians in underserved areas, a California-based foundation is donating $6.6 million to Saint Louis University’s School of Medicine.

Venture Cafe is not a typical cafe. Visitors will find coffee, beer and wine, but replace the typical pastries with entrepreneurs.

“I talk about serendipitous collisions,” Venture Cafe’s executive director Travis Sheridan told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh on Tuesday. “It’s about getting the right people at the right place at the right time, and then miraculously the right things happen.”

via Burned Recover Support Group

The Missouri Children’s Burn Camp, which recently finished its 18th year, has all the activities you’d expect: swimming and boating, archery, and arts and crafts.

But its campers are all burn survivors, and this camp has a hidden agenda.

Nurses for Newborns

Organizers of a St. Louis-area diaper drive say they’re extending their effort another week because of enthusiastic community response.

Disposable diapers are estimated to cost up to $100 a month for one baby. Some St. Louis nonprofits try to assist families, but there is no dedicated diaper bank charity in the city.

(via Flickr/HeatherKaiser)

Black Friday. Cyber Monday. And now, Giving Tuesday.

Last year New York's 92nd Street Y launched a Giving Tuesday campaign to kick-start charitable donations in the wake of the shopping fervor of Black Friday and Cyber Monday. The United Nations Foundation joined the campaign as a partner with the Y, and in the end 2,500 organizations participated in 2012.

Used With Permission: Mary Schanuel

Taking advantage of our community’s diversity can be a challenge.  While people of different ethnicities, cultures, and ages are all around us we can often find ourselves on the outside looking in.  Host Don Marsh talks with guests about ways non-profit and arts organizations can engage new and underserved communities and improve their diversity.

Courtesy STL Crane Project

Art Hill in Forest Park is the temporary home for 1,000 origami cranes this weekend. 

More than 100 volunteers helped make the cranes, which can be “adopted” for $10 each at 10 a.m. Sunday. 

The proceeds go to benefit Backstoppers, a local charity that assists the families of public safety workers who die in the line of duty. 

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Building on the success and popularity of Pepsi Refresh and similar programs, Monsanto has launched its own competitive grants for St. Louis-area non-profits.

"We're asking St. Louis to nominate, and subsequently to vote on their favorite schools, their favorite agencies, their favorite non-profits," said Monsanto CEO Hugh Grant at Tuesday's announcement of the Grow St. Louis program. "They'll have the opportunity through that voting system to win a grant. It's kind of like American Idol without the music."