Northside Regeneration

courtesy of Northside Regeneration

Developer Paul McKee is finally using the Tax Increment Financing approved years ago by the city of St. Louis.

The Board of Aldermen approved a bill on Friday to release $2.8 million in TIF for infrastructure around a proposed grocery store and gas station McKee announced in March. It’s the first time McKee has sought to use any of the $390 million TIF first approved in 2009 for his massive Northside Regeneration project.

Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Paul McKee’s Northside Regeneration is wasting little time now that the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency has officially chosen to build in St. Louis.

The developer announced on Tuesday he’s partnering with CRG Real Estate Solutions and Washington D.C.-based Telesis Corporation to build 500 residential units over the next five years.

GreenLeaf Market, ZOOM Store
(courtesy Northside Regeneration)

Northside Regeneration developer Paul McKee’s plan for a nearly two-square mile area of north St. Louis, has had many false starts.

"This is the most difficult urban project in the country, and it’s taken me years to assemble the land," McKee said Wednesday.

(Maria Altman, St. Louis Public Radio)

The city could pay developer Paul McKee for his redevelopment rights, as well as his land, if the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency chooses the north city site.

St. Louis Development Corporation executive director Otis Williams confirmed that this week. He told St. Louis Public Radio the city is negotiating with McKee over both.

courtesy National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

Buy it and they will come.

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen approved a measure Friday to take a $20 million loan in order to buy land within the proposed site for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. The loan will use one--- possibly two---city buildings as collateral. The measure passed with a vote of 18-9 with one abstention.

The NGA, however, will not choose among four possible locations in the St. Louis region until next year.

(courtesy Masonry Association)

The Bank of Washington has loaned developer Paul McKee at least $34 million for his Northside Regeneration project, and possibly as much as $62 million.

The series of 17 loans from the Washington, Mo., bank was made to several of McKee’s holding companies and to Northside Regeneration between 2006 and 2012. The bank, by its own calculations, now holds more than 1,500 parcels as collateral, or about 78 percent of Northside Regeneration’s real estate in St. Louis.

Maria Altman | St. Louis Public Radio

Several of Paul McKee’s properties within the proposed footprint of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency were sold at auction on Tuesday.

The company that put the 46 parcels on the auction block - Titan Fish Two - had the winning bid of $3.2 million. It’s the same company that filed suit against McKee’s Northside Regeneration in April, claiming it’s owed more than $17 million over defaulted loans.

Paul McKee, NGA
Maria Altman | St. Louis Public Radio

The city of St. Louis wants the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency to relocate to the north side of the city. In order to make it a viable option, the city is hustling to buy all 100 acres in the proposed footprint just north of the former Pruitt-Igoe housing project site.

Yet more than half of the property is owned by developer Paul McKee’s Northside Regeneration, which received significant state tax subsidization to acquire the land.

Paul McKee pays property taxes, Paul McKee, property taxes
Maria Altman | St. Louis Public Radio

Developer Paul McKee has paid his tax bill to the city of St. Louis.

St. Louis Public Radio reported in April that McKee's company, Northside Regeneration, had failed to pay more than $750,000 in real estate property taxes for 2013 and 2014. The company owns more than 2,000 parcels on the city's north side.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

Two auctions were held Monday in connection with developer Paul McKee’s McEagle Properties, LLC.

In the first auction, held by Triad Bank, McKee appeared to pay off McEagle’s remaining debt to the bank. A company connected to McKee paid Triad $748,000 for McEagle’s assets.

"We are pleased to announce that M Property Services, LLC was the successful bidder for substantially all the assets of McEagle Properties, LLC," said McKee spokesman Jim Gradl in an emailed statement. "M Property Services, LLC is a new entity affiliated with the McKee family."

(Maria Altman, St. Louis Public Radio/Mapbox, OpenStreetMap)

It’s not the first time.

Developer Paul McKee is facing a $17 million lawsuit over defaulted loans connected to the Northside Regeneration project in St. Louis, and he owes more than $750,000 in property taxes to the city.

But in previously reported but somewhat forgotten news, McKee and his company, Hazelwood Logistics Center, LLC, were ordered to pay a bank $32 million in a federal judgment back in 2011. So far, just a small fraction has been paid.

Developer Paul McKee outlined his plans for an urgent care hospital at 25th St. and Maiden Ln. in July of 2014.
Maria Altman | St. Louis Public Radio

The company with ambitions to bring St. Louis' north side back to life is responding to a lawsuit filed Monday in St. Louis County that alleges Northside Regeneration defaulted on loans and owes more than $17 million.

Paul McKee's company released a statement Friday that said the suit, filed by Titan Fish Two LLC, was meant to "embarrass" Northside.

Photo of 25 Street and Maiden Lane, within the footprint of the Northside Regeneration project.
Maria Altman | St. Louis Public Radio

Developer Paul McKee owns more than 1,500 acres on the north side of St. Louis, but for the last two years he has not paid property taxes on nearly any of it.

In examining real estate property taxes, St. Louis Public Radio discovered McKee’s company, Northside Regeneration LLC, owes the city more than $750,000 in taxes for 2013 and 2014. That total includes nearly $120,000 in interest and penalties.

The developer acknowledged the tax bill and said it would get paid.

The proposed site for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency in north St. Louis.
National Geospatial Intelligence Agency | provided

The city of St. Louis expects to start making offers in early May on the properties within the proposed site for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency.

That includes land owned by developer Paul McKee, who owns more than half of the parcels in the 100-acre area.

Until now, it had been unclear whether the city or McKee would sell the land to the federal government should the intelligence agency choose the north city site. McKee owns more than 350 parcels within the site just north of Pruitt-Igoe.

Developer Paul McKee outlined his plans for an urgent care hospital at 25th St. and Maiden Ln. in July of last year.
Maria Altman | St. Louis Public Radio

Developer Paul McKee is asking the state of Missouri for permission to relocate a proposed urgent care facility to the former Pruitt-Igoe site in north St. Louis.

The proposed site for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency in north St. Louis.
National Geospatial Intelligence Agency | provided

St. Louis officials are providing clarification of how the city would implement eminent domain to clear a swath of land on the north side of St. Louis.

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay thanks HUD Deputy Director Nani Coloretti for the grant as 5th Ward Alderwoman Tammika Hubbard looks on.
Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 5:00 p.m. with further information about planning partners and neighborhood boundaries.

The neighborhood centered around an 1,800-unit assisted housing project just north of downtown St. Louis will be the focus of a $500,000 planning grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced Friday.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The long-delayed NorthSide Redevelopment project in St. Louis took a step forward Monday.

The Missouri Department of Health's Facilities Review Committee granted a certificate of need for a three-bed urgent care hospital that's part of developer Paul McKee's master plan for the overall project.  No one spoke in opposition to granting McKee a certificate of need during the committee's meeting, and the vote in favor was 7-0.

The facility is to be built at 25th Street and Maiden Lane.

(Flickr, Bernt Rostad)

Detroit and St. Louis can learn from one another.

That was the idea behind a visit to St. Louis by a group of Detroit community development professionals this week.

The Detroit Revitalization Fellows met with representatives from Preservation Research St. Louis, Washington University Medical Center Redevelopment Corporation, Old North St. Louis Restoration Group, Northside Regeneration and Cortex.

Developer Paul McKee outlined his plans for an urgent care hospital at 25th St. and Maiden Ln. in July of 2014.
Maria Altman | St. Louis Public Radio

Developer Paul McKee unveiled plans Wednesday for an urgent care facility on the north side of St. Louis, but questions at the press event turned to the lack of infrastructure projects in McKee's massive, 1,500 acre redevelopment area.

Natl GEOINT Agency

The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency has released the location of six sites under consideration for its new facility in the St. Louis region. 

The agency employs about 3,000 people at its current location at 3200 South 2nd St. and Arsenal Street in St. Louis.

(provided by Northside Regeneration)

A new urgent care hospital is planned within the Northside Regeneration project in north St. Louis.

Developer Paul McKee will announce plans Wednesday for the first big project within the 1,500-acre footprint of the redevelopment zone. Mayor Francis Slay, state Sen. Jamilah Nasheed and state Rep. Penny Hubbard are expected to attend.

Although nothing official has been released, people close to the project say the facility will likely be about 16,000 square feet.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Developer Paul McKee has two weeks to reimburse the city of St. Louis for legal fees associated with his Northside Regeneration project. 

The city’s Board of Estimate and Apportionment voted Wednesday to give McKee until April 30 to pay approximately $57,000 in legal fees. That money is associated with a roughly three-year legal battle over McKee's proposal to redevelop portions of north St. Louis.

(Via Flickr/Mandalit)

St. Louis is one of seven cities that the Obama administration chose in the second wave of its Strong Cities, Strong Communities Initiative.

As a result the city will get a full-time federal employee who will work out of Mayor Francis Slay’s office for at least a year.

A team of federal employees and fellows also will provide technical assistance and inter-agency support.

The goal is to push economic development forward in struggling cities.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Without any debate, the Board of Aldermen gave its final blessing, by a vote of 21-3, to legislation kick-starting tax increment financing for developer Paul McKee’s NorthSide Regeneration project.

It’s a move that finally ends a legislative process that began exactly four years ago -- in October 2009 -- when the board approved bills for the first two phases of the redevelopment plan.

Board of Aldermen President Lewis Reed presides over the debate over tax increment financing for the NorthSide Regeneration project. Reed voted for Tammika Hubbard's bills, which need a final vote before they go to Mayor Francis Slay's desk.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The St. Louis Board of Aldermen has given initial approval to two bills giving tax increment financing to Paul McKee’s NorthSide Regeneration project. Both bills need another vote to go to St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay’s desk.

Board of Aldermen President Lewis Reed presides over the debate over tax increment financing for the NorthSide Regeneration project. Reed voted for Tammika Hubbard's bills, which need a final vote before they go to Mayor Francis Slay's desk.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Dear Beaconites –

Watching developments this week, it seemed that Paul McKee's NorthSide Regeneration project passed over some invisible continental divide in support and is now on the downhill slope toward actually happening.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: A Board of Aldermen committee passed two bills Wednesday aimed at kick-starting Paul McKee’s NorthSide Regeneration project. The bills now go to the full board for approval.

The committee's continues the project's momentum after months of inaction, largely because of a court case. The project recently won the support of vocal opponent Alderman Freeman Bosley Sr., and U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay used his first time to testify before a state aldermanic committee to support McKee's project.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay introduced Mayor Francis Slay at his fourth-term inauguration, the St. Louis Democrat pledged to help make "the NorthSide Regeneration project a great success."

Clay called developer Paul McKee’s controversial and long-delayed plan "an opportunity to infuse millions of dollars in job-creating developments into a neighborhood that has been disinvested, underserved and under-appreciated for decades."

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Beacon.

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon’s Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about the week’s politics.  

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