Northside Regeneration Initiative

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The St. Louis Board of Aldermen is unlikely to vote on a $200 million bond issue until after the August primary election. That's because Board president Lewis Reed put a temporary kibosh on bill by tabling any discussion of the issue.

Reed cited a litany of reasons for the delay, including the need to continue negotiations with the mayor's office and fine-tune the bill. 

(St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated following the show.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Slowly but surely, developer Paul McKee’s plan to make over a large section of the city of St. Louis is again coming to fruition.

The legislation approved by the city’s Housing, Urban Development and Zoning committee today authorizes additional tax incentives for McKee’s NorthSide Regeneration Initiative, and restarts the development clock for the entire project.

The vote was delayed by a day after some members of the committee did not show up in order to deny a quorum.

(Maria Altman/St. Louis Public Radio)

Big political weight was behind two NorthSide Regeneration bills that went before a St. Louis aldermanic committee Tuesday morning, but no vote was taken after four aldermen failed to attend.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Legislative hearings get underway next week on the measures that could finally lead to the start of Paul McKee’s massive redevelopment project for north St. Louis.

A court case held up the $8.1 billion project for three years. The measures up for debate would give McKee access to an additional $192 million in tax assistance, and restart the project’s clock. Mayor Francis Slay and Congressman William Lacy Clay are both expected to speak in support at Tuesday's hearing. 

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

An $8.1 billion plan to remake a big chunk of north St. Louis continues to face stiff opposition, four years after it was first made public.

More than 200 people, most of them opposed to the Northside Regeneration Initiative, packed the St. Louis city Tax Increment Financing Commission meeting today urging its members to spike the project completely.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

After over 3 years of litigation, developer Paul McKee’s controversial Northside Regeneration Project is being allowed to proceed.  On Tuesday the Missouri Supreme Court reversed a lower court decision blocking McKee’s use of so-called "Tax Increment Financing," (TIF) for the development.

(Maria Altman/St. Louis Public Radio)

A huge redevelopment project on St. Louis’ north side has been in a holding pattern for years.

A lawsuit challenged the city’s authorization of millions of dollars in tax incentives for the 1,500-acre development “Northside Regeneration.”

The Missouri Supreme Court could rule on the case as early as Tuesday.

But as St. Louis Public Radio’s Maria Altman reports, the years of waiting for work to begin have left questions about whether developer Paul McKee can really pull off his expansive plan.

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Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis developer Paul McKee took center stage Tuesday night at a Missouri House hearing on legislation that would extend the lifespan of the Distressed Areas Land Assemblage Tax Credit program (DALATC).

The controversial incentives are set to expire August 28th, but if passed, House Bill 423 would push the expiration date to August 28th, 2019, giving McKee six more years to get his NorthSide Regeneration Project off the ground.  He says the extra time will enable his group to put together large parcels that can be used to lure another Mastercard or another Express Scripts to St. Louis.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis developer Paul McKee’s NorthSide redevelopment plan took center stage today at the Missouri Supreme Court.

He’s been seeking nearly $400 million in Tax Increment Financing (TIF) from the city – but the project has been on hold since Circuit Judge Robert Dierker ruled two years ago that its details are too vague to justify awarding TIF dollars and for declaring two square miles of north St. Louis as blighted.  Cheryl Nelson is one of the plaintiffs.  She says McKee’s project has wrecked the property value of her home.

Next week, the Missouri Supreme Court will hear a legal challenge to Paul McKee's massive plan to remake north St. Louis.

But Mayor Francis Slay is confident development will happen even if the high court rejects the incentives.

A St. Louis judge ruled in 2010 that the legislation approving nearly 400 million dollars in tax incentives for the Northside Regeneration Initiative did not contain enough specific projects.

An appeals court in June agreed, but punted to the Supreme Court because of the interest in the topic.

(via Flickr/pasa47)

What better time than just after Halloween for the Board of Aldermen to raise a bill from the dead.

(via Flickr/pasa47)

A measure that would combine the Bottle District north of the Edward Jones Dome with Paul McKee's larger plan to redevelop north St. Louis ran aground on a procedural motion at City Hall today.

The fate of a massive redevelopment in north St. Louis city will rest with the Missouri Supreme Court.

In an order issued today, the Missouri Court of Appeals for the Eastern District wrote that it agrees with a district court ruling throwing out developer Paul McKee's $8 billion plan for the 1,500-acre site, but "because of the general interest and importance of the questions involved, we order this cause transferred to the Missouri Supreme Court ..."

(Matt Sepic/St. Louis Public Radio)

A wait-and-see game is again underway for opponents and supporters of an $8 billion plan to make over 1,500 acres of north St. Louis city.

(via Flickr/pasa47)

Paul McKee's redevelopment footprint in north St. Louis is a major step closer to growing by 17 acres.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

They called her "Mama Duck," for the way she tried to move everyone toward consensus.

She was a "pillar" of an alderwoman despite her short stature, a small lady with big ideas, compassionate, steady, deliberate.

They gave her a crystal bowl, because, as alderwoman Marlene Davis put it, "When you look at crystal, you know that it has that shine, that gleam, but it's also sturdy and lifelong, and that's you."

That's how members of the St. Louis Board of Aldermen said farewell to April Ford-Griffin at City Hall this morning.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

In March, the Missouri Supreme Court heard a case regarding the constitutionality of a state tax credit which, as we stated then, enabled St. Louis developer Paul McKee to buy up several tracts of land on the city’s north side.

At that time, McKee had received $28 million in tax credits for his NorthSide project and St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay signed off on the project in February.

Today, the Missouri Supreme Court said that the tax credit is, indeed, constitutional.

When the case was heard in March, attorney Irene Smith, who represents plaintiffs and North St. Louis residents Barbara Manzara and Keith Marquard,  said that the tax credit violates the state constitution by giving state tax dollars to private business interests.

The Supreme Court cited a couple different reasons for their decision.

The final step for approval of Paul McKee, Jr’s Northside project was taken earlier this week. St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay signed off on an updated plan for the $8.1 billion project Tuesday, according to a report today by the St. Louis Business Journal.

A small piece of an $8.1 billion plan to redevelop north St. Louis took another step forward today.

Developer Paul McKee is moving forward with part of his controversial development of north St. Louis.

That's despite a ruling from a circuit court judge which is holding back nearly $400 million in tax increment financing (TIF).

Fifth Ward Alderwoman April Ford-Griffin says the project will create a recycling center and clear 21 vacant lots near the new Mississippi River Bridge.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated 4:20 p.m. to correct math error in amount of demolition and remediation.

Developer Paul McKee's plan to revitalize North St. Louis is taking a few small steps forward.

Alderwoman April Ford-Griffin will officially introduce legislation tomorrow  authorizing Northside Regeneration LLC, McKee's company, to start work on about $3 million of projects in the two-square mile site.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

NorthSide developer Paul McKee, Jr. has released "An Open Letter to the People of St. Louis" regarding the progress, process and questions surrounding the Northside Regeneration Initiative.

This comes with the announcement that McKee has gotten an additional $8 million in state tax credits for the $8 billion, that's billion with a "B," Northside project.